Tick avoidance behaviors associated with a decreased risk of anti-tick salivary gland protein antibody seropositivity in military personnel exposed to Amblyomma americanum in Arkansas

Brian S Schwartz, Jose L. Sanchez, Martin L. Sanders, Robert F. DeFraites

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

During April through September 1990, 399 military personnel who originated from either Fort Chaffee, Arkansas (n = 236) or Fort Wainwright, Alaska (n = 163) were studied during maneuvers in tick-infested areas at Fort Chaffee. Study subjects completed a questionnaire and had pre- and post- maneuvers serum specimens analyzed for antibodies to several rickettsial and ehrlichial agents and to Amblyomma americanum (lone star tick) salivary gland proteins (anti-tick saliva antibodies [ATSA], a biologic marker of tick exposure). Military rank/grade and home station were associated with pre- maneuvers ATSA seropositivity by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Fort Wainwright personnel were more likely to show at least a 50% increase in ATSA levels, compared with subjects from Fort Chaffee, from the pre- to the post maneuvers specimen (adjusted odds ratio [AOR] = 2.7, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.2-6.1). Subjects from Fort Wainwright who did not report use of bed netting were at an increased risk of post-maneuvers ATSA seropositivity (AOR = 4.1, 95% CI = 1.5-11.5). In contrast, subjects from Fort Chaffee who did not report tucking pants into socks were at increased risk of post-maneuvers ATSA seropositivity (AOR = 2.8, 95% CI = 1.1-7.1). Subjects from Fort Chaffee who reported an attached tick bite during maneuvers were more likely to be ATSA-seropositive in the post-maneuvers specimen (AOR = 2.5, 95% CI = 1.2-5.2). Western blot assays revealed large differences in tick salivary gland proteins that were recognized on the post- maneuvers specimen among three randomly selected individuals, and small differences within a single individual who reported a tick bite during maneuvers, comparing pre- and post-maneuvers specimens. The ATSA ELISA seropositivity was not associated with seroconversion to the tick-borne infectious agents.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)410-416
Number of pages7
JournalAmerican Journal of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene
Volume55
Issue number4
StatePublished - 1996

Fingerprint

Arthropod Proteins
Salivary Proteins and Peptides
Avoidance Learning
Military Personnel
Ticks
Saliva
Antibodies
Odds Ratio
Confidence Intervals
Tick Bites
Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay
Individuality

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Parasitology
  • Infectious Diseases

Cite this

@article{18c72e73f4ea47f58764a662864d5559,
title = "Tick avoidance behaviors associated with a decreased risk of anti-tick salivary gland protein antibody seropositivity in military personnel exposed to Amblyomma americanum in Arkansas",
abstract = "During April through September 1990, 399 military personnel who originated from either Fort Chaffee, Arkansas (n = 236) or Fort Wainwright, Alaska (n = 163) were studied during maneuvers in tick-infested areas at Fort Chaffee. Study subjects completed a questionnaire and had pre- and post- maneuvers serum specimens analyzed for antibodies to several rickettsial and ehrlichial agents and to Amblyomma americanum (lone star tick) salivary gland proteins (anti-tick saliva antibodies [ATSA], a biologic marker of tick exposure). Military rank/grade and home station were associated with pre- maneuvers ATSA seropositivity by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Fort Wainwright personnel were more likely to show at least a 50{\%} increase in ATSA levels, compared with subjects from Fort Chaffee, from the pre- to the post maneuvers specimen (adjusted odds ratio [AOR] = 2.7, 95{\%} confidence interval [CI] = 1.2-6.1). Subjects from Fort Wainwright who did not report use of bed netting were at an increased risk of post-maneuvers ATSA seropositivity (AOR = 4.1, 95{\%} CI = 1.5-11.5). In contrast, subjects from Fort Chaffee who did not report tucking pants into socks were at increased risk of post-maneuvers ATSA seropositivity (AOR = 2.8, 95{\%} CI = 1.1-7.1). Subjects from Fort Chaffee who reported an attached tick bite during maneuvers were more likely to be ATSA-seropositive in the post-maneuvers specimen (AOR = 2.5, 95{\%} CI = 1.2-5.2). Western blot assays revealed large differences in tick salivary gland proteins that were recognized on the post- maneuvers specimen among three randomly selected individuals, and small differences within a single individual who reported a tick bite during maneuvers, comparing pre- and post-maneuvers specimens. The ATSA ELISA seropositivity was not associated with seroconversion to the tick-borne infectious agents.",
author = "Schwartz, {Brian S} and Sanchez, {Jose L.} and Sanders, {Martin L.} and DeFraites, {Robert F.}",
year = "1996",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "55",
pages = "410--416",
journal = "American Journal of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene",
issn = "0002-9637",
publisher = "American Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene",
number = "4",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Tick avoidance behaviors associated with a decreased risk of anti-tick salivary gland protein antibody seropositivity in military personnel exposed to Amblyomma americanum in Arkansas

AU - Schwartz, Brian S

AU - Sanchez, Jose L.

AU - Sanders, Martin L.

AU - DeFraites, Robert F.

PY - 1996

Y1 - 1996

N2 - During April through September 1990, 399 military personnel who originated from either Fort Chaffee, Arkansas (n = 236) or Fort Wainwright, Alaska (n = 163) were studied during maneuvers in tick-infested areas at Fort Chaffee. Study subjects completed a questionnaire and had pre- and post- maneuvers serum specimens analyzed for antibodies to several rickettsial and ehrlichial agents and to Amblyomma americanum (lone star tick) salivary gland proteins (anti-tick saliva antibodies [ATSA], a biologic marker of tick exposure). Military rank/grade and home station were associated with pre- maneuvers ATSA seropositivity by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Fort Wainwright personnel were more likely to show at least a 50% increase in ATSA levels, compared with subjects from Fort Chaffee, from the pre- to the post maneuvers specimen (adjusted odds ratio [AOR] = 2.7, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.2-6.1). Subjects from Fort Wainwright who did not report use of bed netting were at an increased risk of post-maneuvers ATSA seropositivity (AOR = 4.1, 95% CI = 1.5-11.5). In contrast, subjects from Fort Chaffee who did not report tucking pants into socks were at increased risk of post-maneuvers ATSA seropositivity (AOR = 2.8, 95% CI = 1.1-7.1). Subjects from Fort Chaffee who reported an attached tick bite during maneuvers were more likely to be ATSA-seropositive in the post-maneuvers specimen (AOR = 2.5, 95% CI = 1.2-5.2). Western blot assays revealed large differences in tick salivary gland proteins that were recognized on the post- maneuvers specimen among three randomly selected individuals, and small differences within a single individual who reported a tick bite during maneuvers, comparing pre- and post-maneuvers specimens. The ATSA ELISA seropositivity was not associated with seroconversion to the tick-borne infectious agents.

AB - During April through September 1990, 399 military personnel who originated from either Fort Chaffee, Arkansas (n = 236) or Fort Wainwright, Alaska (n = 163) were studied during maneuvers in tick-infested areas at Fort Chaffee. Study subjects completed a questionnaire and had pre- and post- maneuvers serum specimens analyzed for antibodies to several rickettsial and ehrlichial agents and to Amblyomma americanum (lone star tick) salivary gland proteins (anti-tick saliva antibodies [ATSA], a biologic marker of tick exposure). Military rank/grade and home station were associated with pre- maneuvers ATSA seropositivity by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Fort Wainwright personnel were more likely to show at least a 50% increase in ATSA levels, compared with subjects from Fort Chaffee, from the pre- to the post maneuvers specimen (adjusted odds ratio [AOR] = 2.7, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.2-6.1). Subjects from Fort Wainwright who did not report use of bed netting were at an increased risk of post-maneuvers ATSA seropositivity (AOR = 4.1, 95% CI = 1.5-11.5). In contrast, subjects from Fort Chaffee who did not report tucking pants into socks were at increased risk of post-maneuvers ATSA seropositivity (AOR = 2.8, 95% CI = 1.1-7.1). Subjects from Fort Chaffee who reported an attached tick bite during maneuvers were more likely to be ATSA-seropositive in the post-maneuvers specimen (AOR = 2.5, 95% CI = 1.2-5.2). Western blot assays revealed large differences in tick salivary gland proteins that were recognized on the post- maneuvers specimen among three randomly selected individuals, and small differences within a single individual who reported a tick bite during maneuvers, comparing pre- and post-maneuvers specimens. The ATSA ELISA seropositivity was not associated with seroconversion to the tick-borne infectious agents.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0029911445&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0029911445&partnerID=8YFLogxK

M3 - Article

VL - 55

SP - 410

EP - 416

JO - American Journal of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene

JF - American Journal of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene

SN - 0002-9637

IS - 4

ER -