Thyroid function and prevalent and incident metabolic syndrome in older adults

The health, ageing and body composition study

Avantika C. Waring, Nicolas Rodondi, Stephanie Harrison, Alka M. Kanaya, Eleanor Marie Simonsick, Iva Miljkovic, Suzanne Satterfield, Anne B. Newman, Douglas C. Bauer

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Objective Both subclinical hypothyroidism and the metabolic syndrome have been associated with increased risk of coronary heart disease events. It is unknown whether the prevalence and incidence of metabolic syndrome is higher as TSH levels increase, or in individuals with subclinical hypothyroidism. We sought to determine the association between thyroid function and the prevalence and incidence of the metabolic syndrome in a cohort of older adults. Design Data were analysed from the Health, Ageing and Body Composition Study, a prospective cohort of 3075 community-dwelling US adults. Participants Two thousand one hundred and nineteen participants with measured TSH and data on metabolic syndrome components were included in the analysis. Measurements TSH was measured by immunoassay. Metabolic syndrome was defined per revised ATP III criteria. Results At baseline, 684 participants met criteria for metabolic syndrome. At 6-year follow-up, incident metabolic syndrome developed in 239 individuals. In fully adjusted models, each unit increase in TSH was associated with a 3% increase in the odds of prevalent metabolic syndrome (OR, 1·03; 95% CI, 1·01-1·06; P = 0·02), and the association was stronger for TSH within the normal range (OR, 1·16; 95% CI, 1·03-1·30; P = 0·02). Subclinical hypothyroidism with a TSH > 10 mIU/l was significantly associated with increased odds of prevalent metabolic syndrome (OR, 2·3; 95% CI, 1·0-5·0; P = 0·04); the odds of incident MetS was similar (OR 2·2), but the confidence interval was wide (0·6-7·5). Conclusions Higher TSH levels and subclinical hypothyroidism with a TSH > 10 mIU/l are associated with increased odds of prevalent but not incident metabolic syndrome.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)911-918
Number of pages8
JournalClinical Endocrinology
Volume76
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 2012

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Body Composition
Thyroid Gland
Health
Hypothyroidism
Independent Living
Incidence
Immunoassay
Coronary Disease
Reference Values
Adenosine Triphosphate
Prospective Studies
Confidence Intervals

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism

Cite this

Thyroid function and prevalent and incident metabolic syndrome in older adults : The health, ageing and body composition study. / Waring, Avantika C.; Rodondi, Nicolas; Harrison, Stephanie; Kanaya, Alka M.; Simonsick, Eleanor Marie; Miljkovic, Iva; Satterfield, Suzanne; Newman, Anne B.; Bauer, Douglas C.

In: Clinical Endocrinology, Vol. 76, No. 6, 06.2012, p. 911-918.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Waring, AC, Rodondi, N, Harrison, S, Kanaya, AM, Simonsick, EM, Miljkovic, I, Satterfield, S, Newman, AB & Bauer, DC 2012, 'Thyroid function and prevalent and incident metabolic syndrome in older adults: The health, ageing and body composition study', Clinical Endocrinology, vol. 76, no. 6, pp. 911-918. https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1365-2265.2011.04328.x
Waring, Avantika C. ; Rodondi, Nicolas ; Harrison, Stephanie ; Kanaya, Alka M. ; Simonsick, Eleanor Marie ; Miljkovic, Iva ; Satterfield, Suzanne ; Newman, Anne B. ; Bauer, Douglas C. / Thyroid function and prevalent and incident metabolic syndrome in older adults : The health, ageing and body composition study. In: Clinical Endocrinology. 2012 ; Vol. 76, No. 6. pp. 911-918.
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abstract = "Objective Both subclinical hypothyroidism and the metabolic syndrome have been associated with increased risk of coronary heart disease events. It is unknown whether the prevalence and incidence of metabolic syndrome is higher as TSH levels increase, or in individuals with subclinical hypothyroidism. We sought to determine the association between thyroid function and the prevalence and incidence of the metabolic syndrome in a cohort of older adults. Design Data were analysed from the Health, Ageing and Body Composition Study, a prospective cohort of 3075 community-dwelling US adults. Participants Two thousand one hundred and nineteen participants with measured TSH and data on metabolic syndrome components were included in the analysis. Measurements TSH was measured by immunoassay. Metabolic syndrome was defined per revised ATP III criteria. Results At baseline, 684 participants met criteria for metabolic syndrome. At 6-year follow-up, incident metabolic syndrome developed in 239 individuals. In fully adjusted models, each unit increase in TSH was associated with a 3{\%} increase in the odds of prevalent metabolic syndrome (OR, 1·03; 95{\%} CI, 1·01-1·06; P = 0·02), and the association was stronger for TSH within the normal range (OR, 1·16; 95{\%} CI, 1·03-1·30; P = 0·02). Subclinical hypothyroidism with a TSH > 10 mIU/l was significantly associated with increased odds of prevalent metabolic syndrome (OR, 2·3; 95{\%} CI, 1·0-5·0; P = 0·04); the odds of incident MetS was similar (OR 2·2), but the confidence interval was wide (0·6-7·5). Conclusions Higher TSH levels and subclinical hypothyroidism with a TSH > 10 mIU/l are associated with increased odds of prevalent but not incident metabolic syndrome.",
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T1 - Thyroid function and prevalent and incident metabolic syndrome in older adults

T2 - The health, ageing and body composition study

AU - Waring, Avantika C.

AU - Rodondi, Nicolas

AU - Harrison, Stephanie

AU - Kanaya, Alka M.

AU - Simonsick, Eleanor Marie

AU - Miljkovic, Iva

AU - Satterfield, Suzanne

AU - Newman, Anne B.

AU - Bauer, Douglas C.

PY - 2012/6

Y1 - 2012/6

N2 - Objective Both subclinical hypothyroidism and the metabolic syndrome have been associated with increased risk of coronary heart disease events. It is unknown whether the prevalence and incidence of metabolic syndrome is higher as TSH levels increase, or in individuals with subclinical hypothyroidism. We sought to determine the association between thyroid function and the prevalence and incidence of the metabolic syndrome in a cohort of older adults. Design Data were analysed from the Health, Ageing and Body Composition Study, a prospective cohort of 3075 community-dwelling US adults. Participants Two thousand one hundred and nineteen participants with measured TSH and data on metabolic syndrome components were included in the analysis. Measurements TSH was measured by immunoassay. Metabolic syndrome was defined per revised ATP III criteria. Results At baseline, 684 participants met criteria for metabolic syndrome. At 6-year follow-up, incident metabolic syndrome developed in 239 individuals. In fully adjusted models, each unit increase in TSH was associated with a 3% increase in the odds of prevalent metabolic syndrome (OR, 1·03; 95% CI, 1·01-1·06; P = 0·02), and the association was stronger for TSH within the normal range (OR, 1·16; 95% CI, 1·03-1·30; P = 0·02). Subclinical hypothyroidism with a TSH > 10 mIU/l was significantly associated with increased odds of prevalent metabolic syndrome (OR, 2·3; 95% CI, 1·0-5·0; P = 0·04); the odds of incident MetS was similar (OR 2·2), but the confidence interval was wide (0·6-7·5). Conclusions Higher TSH levels and subclinical hypothyroidism with a TSH > 10 mIU/l are associated with increased odds of prevalent but not incident metabolic syndrome.

AB - Objective Both subclinical hypothyroidism and the metabolic syndrome have been associated with increased risk of coronary heart disease events. It is unknown whether the prevalence and incidence of metabolic syndrome is higher as TSH levels increase, or in individuals with subclinical hypothyroidism. We sought to determine the association between thyroid function and the prevalence and incidence of the metabolic syndrome in a cohort of older adults. Design Data were analysed from the Health, Ageing and Body Composition Study, a prospective cohort of 3075 community-dwelling US adults. Participants Two thousand one hundred and nineteen participants with measured TSH and data on metabolic syndrome components were included in the analysis. Measurements TSH was measured by immunoassay. Metabolic syndrome was defined per revised ATP III criteria. Results At baseline, 684 participants met criteria for metabolic syndrome. At 6-year follow-up, incident metabolic syndrome developed in 239 individuals. In fully adjusted models, each unit increase in TSH was associated with a 3% increase in the odds of prevalent metabolic syndrome (OR, 1·03; 95% CI, 1·01-1·06; P = 0·02), and the association was stronger for TSH within the normal range (OR, 1·16; 95% CI, 1·03-1·30; P = 0·02). Subclinical hypothyroidism with a TSH > 10 mIU/l was significantly associated with increased odds of prevalent metabolic syndrome (OR, 2·3; 95% CI, 1·0-5·0; P = 0·04); the odds of incident MetS was similar (OR 2·2), but the confidence interval was wide (0·6-7·5). Conclusions Higher TSH levels and subclinical hypothyroidism with a TSH > 10 mIU/l are associated with increased odds of prevalent but not incident metabolic syndrome.

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