Thoracolumbar immobilization for trauma patients with torso gunshot wounds: Is it necessary?

Edward E. Cornwell, David C. Chang, James P. Bonar, Kurtis A. Campbell, Judy Phillips, Pamela A Lipsett, Thomas Scalea, Robert Bass

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Background: Previous studies have suggested that patients transported by emergency medical services (EMS) following major trauma had a longer injury-to-treatment interval and a higher mortality rate than their non-EMS-transported counterparts. Hypothesis: There is little actual benefit of thoracolumbar immobilization for patients with torso gunshot wounds (GSW). Design: Retrospective analysis of prospectively gathered data from the Maryland Institute for Emergency Medical Service Systems State Trauma Registry from July 1, 1995, through June 30, 1998. Settings: All designated trauma centers in Maryland. Patients: All patients with torso GSW. Main Outcome Measures: (1) A patient was considered to have benefited from immobilization if he or she had less than complete neurologic deficits in the presence of an unstable vertebral column, as shown by the need for operative stabilization of the vertebral column: (2) mortality. Results: There were 1000 patients with torso GSW. Among them, 141 patients (14.1%) had vertebral column and/or spinal cord injuries. Two patients (0.2%) (95% confidence interval, -0.077% to 0.48%) required operative vertebral column stabilization, while 6 others required other spinal operations for decompression and/or foreign body removal. The presence of vertebral column injury was actually associated with lower mortality (7.1% vs 14.8%. P

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)324-327
Number of pages4
JournalArchives of Surgery
Volume136
Issue number3
StatePublished - 2001

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Torso
Gunshot Wounds
Immobilization
Wounds and Injuries
Spine
Emergency Medical Services
Mortality
Trauma Centers
Neurologic Manifestations
Decompression
Foreign Bodies
Spinal Cord Injuries
Registries
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)
Confidence Intervals

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery

Cite this

Cornwell, E. E., Chang, D. C., Bonar, J. P., Campbell, K. A., Phillips, J., Lipsett, P. A., ... Bass, R. (2001). Thoracolumbar immobilization for trauma patients with torso gunshot wounds: Is it necessary? Archives of Surgery, 136(3), 324-327.

Thoracolumbar immobilization for trauma patients with torso gunshot wounds : Is it necessary? / Cornwell, Edward E.; Chang, David C.; Bonar, James P.; Campbell, Kurtis A.; Phillips, Judy; Lipsett, Pamela A; Scalea, Thomas; Bass, Robert.

In: Archives of Surgery, Vol. 136, No. 3, 2001, p. 324-327.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Cornwell, EE, Chang, DC, Bonar, JP, Campbell, KA, Phillips, J, Lipsett, PA, Scalea, T & Bass, R 2001, 'Thoracolumbar immobilization for trauma patients with torso gunshot wounds: Is it necessary?', Archives of Surgery, vol. 136, no. 3, pp. 324-327.
Cornwell EE, Chang DC, Bonar JP, Campbell KA, Phillips J, Lipsett PA et al. Thoracolumbar immobilization for trauma patients with torso gunshot wounds: Is it necessary? Archives of Surgery. 2001;136(3):324-327.
Cornwell, Edward E. ; Chang, David C. ; Bonar, James P. ; Campbell, Kurtis A. ; Phillips, Judy ; Lipsett, Pamela A ; Scalea, Thomas ; Bass, Robert. / Thoracolumbar immobilization for trauma patients with torso gunshot wounds : Is it necessary?. In: Archives of Surgery. 2001 ; Vol. 136, No. 3. pp. 324-327.
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