“Think Like a Man”: How Sexual Cultural Scripting and Masculinity Influence Changes in Men's Use of Intimate Partner Violence

Tiara C. Willie, Enna Khondkaryan, Tamora Callands, Trace Kershaw

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

The purpose of the study was to (a) explore the relationship between sexual cultural scripting and traditional masculine norms on changes in intimate partner violence (IPV) perpetration, and (b) examine traditional masculine norms as an effect modifier among young heterosexual men. This study is a secondary data analysis of a prospective cohort study of 119 young heterosexual men who were followed for 6 months. The adjusted logistic regression results revealed that sexual cultural scripting norms were associated with an increased odds of emotional IPV perpetration and traditional masculine norms were associated with an increased odds of physical IPV perpetration in the past 6 months. There were no significant interaction effects between sexual cultural scripting and traditional masculine norms on IPV perpetration. These findings suggest that socially constructed norms and beliefs surrounding masculinity, femininity, and how women and men interact in sexual relationships are important constructs for understanding the etiology of young men's use of violence against a female partner. While primary IPV interventions targeting young men do address masculinity, sexual cultural scripting is an additional concept that should also be addressed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)240-250
Number of pages11
JournalAmerican Journal of Community Psychology
Volume61
Issue number1-2
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 2018
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Domestic violence
  • Intimate partner violence perpetration
  • Masculinity
  • Sexual scripts
  • Young heterosexual men

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Health(social science)
  • Applied Psychology
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

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