Theta oscillations in visual cortex emerge with experience to convey expected reward time and experienced reward rate

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

The primary visual cortex (V1) is widely regarded as faithfully conveying the physical properties of visual stimuli. Thus, experience induced changes in V1 are often interpreted as improving visual perception (i.e., perceptual learning). Here we describe how, with experience, cue-evoked oscillations emerge in V1 to convey expected reward time as well as to relate experienced reward rate. We show, in chronic multisite local field potential recordings from rat V1, that repeated presentation of visual cues induces the emergence of visually evoked oscillatory activity. Early in training, the visually evoked oscillations relate to the physical parameters of the stimuli. However, with training, the oscillations evolve to relate the time in which those stimuli foretell expected reward. Moreover, the oscillation prevalence reflects the reward rate recently experienced by the animal. Thus, training induces experience-dependent changes in V1 activity that relate to what those stimuli have come to signify behaviorally: when to expect future reward and at what rate.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)9603-9614
Number of pages12
JournalJournal of Neuroscience
Volume35
Issue number26
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 1 2015

Keywords

  • Behavior
  • Local field potential
  • Oscillation
  • Reward
  • Timing
  • Visual cortex

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neuroscience(all)

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