Thermal activation of the visual transduction mechanism in retinal rods [16]

King-Wai Yau, G. Matthews, D. A. Baylor

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

INVERTEBRATE photoreceptors show electrical changes which apparently result from isomerisation of single rhodopsin molecules by light or thermal energy1-3. Observation of corresponding phenomena in vertebrates has been prevented by intercellular electrical coupling, which averages membrane potential over many photoreceptors4-6. Recently, however, recordings of membrane current from individual rod outer segments have revealed responses to single photons7,8. Here we report that similar electrical events occasionally occur in darkness, perhaps because of thermal isomerisation of rhodopsin.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)806-807
Number of pages2
JournalNature
Volume279
Issue number5716
DOIs
StatePublished - 1979

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Retinal Rod Photoreceptor Cells
Rhodopsin
Hot Temperature
Rod Cell Outer Segment
Darkness
Membrane Potentials
Vertebrates
Observation
Light
Membranes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • General

Cite this

Thermal activation of the visual transduction mechanism in retinal rods [16]. / Yau, King-Wai; Matthews, G.; Baylor, D. A.

In: Nature, Vol. 279, No. 5716, 1979, p. 806-807.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Yau, King-Wai ; Matthews, G. ; Baylor, D. A. / Thermal activation of the visual transduction mechanism in retinal rods [16]. In: Nature. 1979 ; Vol. 279, No. 5716. pp. 806-807.
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