Theoretical analysis of the relationship between regional and global measures of myocardial contractility

H. Kusuoka

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Contractile function of the left ventricle is often measured regionally, particularly in intact animals. In this paper I dispute the validity of the common assumption that regional shortening accurately reflects whole-heart mechanics, even when contractility is homogeneous, by using an ellipsoidal model of the left ventricle to examine the relationship between measures of regional function and whole-heart function. Segment shortening and wall thickening are the most common measures of regional function, while the end-systolic pressure-volume relationship, or E(max), is a well-validated index of contractility in the whole heart. Assuming that the arterial end-systolic pressure vs stroke volume relationship is constant, segment shortening shows a monotonically increasing, convex relation to E(max). If, in addition, myocardium is considered an incompressible material, then wall thickening also shows a monotonically increasing, convex relation to E(max). Thus, segment shortening and wall thickening are quite insensitive when measuring high contractility and overly sensitive when measuring low-contractility. Finally, I consider the non-linear relationship between regional measures of function and global contractility, and thereby resolve apparently contradictory findings regarding the inotropic responsiveness of stunned myocardium.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)904-911
Number of pages8
JournalJapanese Circulation Journal
Volume57
Issue number9
StatePublished - 1993
Externally publishedYes

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Heart Ventricles
Myocardial Stunning
Blood Pressure
Dissent and Disputes
Mechanics
Stroke Volume
Myocardium

Keywords

  • end-systolic pressure-volume relation
  • segment shortening
  • stunned myocardium
  • theoretical analysis
  • wall thickening

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Physiology
  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine

Cite this

Theoretical analysis of the relationship between regional and global measures of myocardial contractility. / Kusuoka, H.

In: Japanese Circulation Journal, Vol. 57, No. 9, 1993, p. 904-911.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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