The World Health Organization and the transition from international to global public health

Theodore M. Brown, Marcos Cueto, Elizabeth Fee

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

The term "global health" is rapidly replacing the older terminology of "international health." We describe the role of the World Health Organization (WHO) in both international and global health and in the transition from one to the other. We suggest that the term "global health" emerged as part of larger political and historical processes, in which WHO found its dominant role challenged and began to reposition itself within a shifting set of power alliances. Between 1948 and 1998, WHO moved from being the unquestioned leader of international health to being an organization in crisis, facing budget shortfalls and diminished status, especially given the growing influence of new and powerful players. We argue that WHO began to refashion itself as the coordinator, strategic planner, and leader of global health initiatives as a strategy of survival in response to this transformed international political context.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)62-72
Number of pages11
JournalAmerican Journal of Public Health
Volume96
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 2006
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Health Transition
Public Health
Health
Budgets
Terminology
Organizations
Global Health

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Cite this

The World Health Organization and the transition from international to global public health. / Brown, Theodore M.; Cueto, Marcos; Fee, Elizabeth.

In: American Journal of Public Health, Vol. 96, No. 1, 01.2006, p. 62-72.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Brown, Theodore M. ; Cueto, Marcos ; Fee, Elizabeth. / The World Health Organization and the transition from international to global public health. In: American Journal of Public Health. 2006 ; Vol. 96, No. 1. pp. 62-72.
@article{bf7f4f3201eb4fb69f3e01a48e4218c5,
title = "The World Health Organization and the transition from international to global public health",
abstract = "The term {"}global health{"} is rapidly replacing the older terminology of {"}international health.{"} We describe the role of the World Health Organization (WHO) in both international and global health and in the transition from one to the other. We suggest that the term {"}global health{"} emerged as part of larger political and historical processes, in which WHO found its dominant role challenged and began to reposition itself within a shifting set of power alliances. Between 1948 and 1998, WHO moved from being the unquestioned leader of international health to being an organization in crisis, facing budget shortfalls and diminished status, especially given the growing influence of new and powerful players. We argue that WHO began to refashion itself as the coordinator, strategic planner, and leader of global health initiatives as a strategy of survival in response to this transformed international political context.",
author = "Brown, {Theodore M.} and Marcos Cueto and Elizabeth Fee",
year = "2006",
month = "1",
doi = "10.2105/AJPH.2004.050831",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "96",
pages = "62--72",
journal = "American Journal of Public Health",
issn = "0090-0036",
publisher = "American Public Health Association Inc.",
number = "1",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - The World Health Organization and the transition from international to global public health

AU - Brown, Theodore M.

AU - Cueto, Marcos

AU - Fee, Elizabeth

PY - 2006/1

Y1 - 2006/1

N2 - The term "global health" is rapidly replacing the older terminology of "international health." We describe the role of the World Health Organization (WHO) in both international and global health and in the transition from one to the other. We suggest that the term "global health" emerged as part of larger political and historical processes, in which WHO found its dominant role challenged and began to reposition itself within a shifting set of power alliances. Between 1948 and 1998, WHO moved from being the unquestioned leader of international health to being an organization in crisis, facing budget shortfalls and diminished status, especially given the growing influence of new and powerful players. We argue that WHO began to refashion itself as the coordinator, strategic planner, and leader of global health initiatives as a strategy of survival in response to this transformed international political context.

AB - The term "global health" is rapidly replacing the older terminology of "international health." We describe the role of the World Health Organization (WHO) in both international and global health and in the transition from one to the other. We suggest that the term "global health" emerged as part of larger political and historical processes, in which WHO found its dominant role challenged and began to reposition itself within a shifting set of power alliances. Between 1948 and 1998, WHO moved from being the unquestioned leader of international health to being an organization in crisis, facing budget shortfalls and diminished status, especially given the growing influence of new and powerful players. We argue that WHO began to refashion itself as the coordinator, strategic planner, and leader of global health initiatives as a strategy of survival in response to this transformed international political context.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=29944441036&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=29944441036&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.2105/AJPH.2004.050831

DO - 10.2105/AJPH.2004.050831

M3 - Article

C2 - 16322464

AN - SCOPUS:29944441036

VL - 96

SP - 62

EP - 72

JO - American Journal of Public Health

JF - American Journal of Public Health

SN - 0090-0036

IS - 1

ER -