The Walking Impairment Questionnaire stair-climbing score predicts mortality in men and women with peripheral arterial disease

Atul Jain, Kiang Liu, Luigi Ferrucci, Michael H. Criqui, Lu Tian, Jack M. Guralnik, Huimin Tao, Mary M. McDermott

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Objective: The Walking Impairment Questionnaire (WIQ) measures self-reported walking distance, walking speed, and stair-climbing ability in men and women with lower extremity peripheral arterial disease (PAD). We determined whether poorer WIQ scores are associated with higher all-cause and cardiovascular disease (CVD) mortality in individuals with and without PAD. Methods: We identified 1048 men and women with and without PAD from Chicago-area medical centers. Participants completed the WIQ at baseline and were monitored for a median of 4.5 years. Cox proportional hazards models were used to relate baseline WIQ scores with death, adjusting for age, sex, race, the ankle-brachial index (ABI), comorbidities, and other covariates. Results: During follow-up, 461 participants (44.0%) died, including 158 deaths from CVD. PAD participants in the lowest baseline quartile of the WIQ stair-climbing scores had higher all-cause mortality (hazard ratio, 1.70; 95% confidence interval, 1.08-2.66, P =.02) and higher CVD mortality (hazard ratio, 3.11; 95% confidence interval, 1.30-7.47, P =.01) compared with those with the highest baseline WIQ stair-climbing score. Among PAD participants, there were no significant associations of lower baseline WIQ distance or speed scores with rates of all-cause mortality (P =.20 and P =.07 for trend, respectively) or CVD mortality (P =.51 and P =.33 for trend, respectively). Among non-PAD participants there were no significant associations of lower baseline WIQ stair-climbing, distance, or speed score with rates of all-cause mortality (P =.94, P =.69, and P =.26, for trend, respectively) or CVD mortality (P =.28, P =.68, and P =.78, for trend, respectively). Conclusions: Among participants with PAD, lower WIQ stair-climbing scores are associated with higher all-cause and CVD mortality, independently of the ABI and other covariates.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1662-1673
Number of pages12
JournalJournal of Vascular Surgery
Volume55
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 2012
Externally publishedYes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine
  • Surgery

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