The Use of Protease Inhibitors in Pregnancy

Maternal and Fetal Considerations

Elaine Duryea, Fiona Nicholson, Sara Cooper, Scott Roberts, Vanessa Rogers, Donald McIntire, Jeanne Sheffield, Robert Stewart

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Background. Previous studies examining protease inhibitor use in pregnancy and the rate of preterm and small-for-gestational-age infants have yielded conflicting results. Methods. This was a retrospective study of HIV-infected women who delivered singleton infants at our institution between 1984 and 2014. Women with protease inhibitor use were compared to women on regimens without a protease inhibitor as well as those who received no antepartum antiretroviral therapy. Infants were considered preterm if less than 37 completed weeks of gestation and small-for-gestational-age if less than 10th percentile. Results. During the study period 1,004 pregnancies met inclusion criteria. Of those, 597 received a protease inhibitor as part of their regimen, 230 ART without a protease inhibitor, and 177 no ART. There was no difference in the rate of preterm birth between groups who received ART with or without a protease inhibitor, 14% versus 13%. There was no difference in the rate of small-for-gestational-age infants between the three groups. Use of a protease inhibitor was associated with a greater fall in viral load during pregnancy, p<0.001. Conclusion. In this population with access to prenatal care and ART, treatment with protease inhibitors was associated with a greater fall in viral load, but not an increase in small or preterm infants.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number563727
JournalInfectious Diseases in Obstetrics and Gynecology
Volume2015
DOIs
StatePublished - 2015
Externally publishedYes

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Protease Inhibitors
Mothers
Pregnancy
Small for Gestational Age Infant
Viral Load
Prenatal Care
Premature Birth
Pregnancy Rate
Premature Infants
Gestational Age
Retrospective Studies
HIV
Therapeutics
Population

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Obstetrics and Gynecology
  • Infectious Diseases
  • Dermatology

Cite this

Duryea, E., Nicholson, F., Cooper, S., Roberts, S., Rogers, V., McIntire, D., ... Stewart, R. (2015). The Use of Protease Inhibitors in Pregnancy: Maternal and Fetal Considerations. Infectious Diseases in Obstetrics and Gynecology, 2015, [563727]. https://doi.org/10.1155/2015/563727

The Use of Protease Inhibitors in Pregnancy : Maternal and Fetal Considerations. / Duryea, Elaine; Nicholson, Fiona; Cooper, Sara; Roberts, Scott; Rogers, Vanessa; McIntire, Donald; Sheffield, Jeanne; Stewart, Robert.

In: Infectious Diseases in Obstetrics and Gynecology, Vol. 2015, 563727, 2015.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Duryea, Elaine ; Nicholson, Fiona ; Cooper, Sara ; Roberts, Scott ; Rogers, Vanessa ; McIntire, Donald ; Sheffield, Jeanne ; Stewart, Robert. / The Use of Protease Inhibitors in Pregnancy : Maternal and Fetal Considerations. In: Infectious Diseases in Obstetrics and Gynecology. 2015 ; Vol. 2015.
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