The use of implanted programmable infusion pumps in the management of nonmalignant, chronic low-back pain

Peter Staats, Michael Whitworth, Mark Barakat, William Anderson, Sean Lilienfeld

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Objectives. To assess the mode-of-use of implanted programmable infusion pumps in patients with nonmalignant, chronic low-back pain. Materials and Methods. Charts from 101 consecutive eligible patients were analyzed retrospectively. Data were extracted relating to patient demographics, pump mode of infusion and flow rate, and medications used. Results. Morphine was the agent most frequently used and most patients received one medication at each visit. At the last visit, 94.1% of patients were receiving constant-flow treatment; 90.1% had received such treatment for ≥ six months and 68.3% throughout the entire analysis period. For patients attaining constant-flow treatment, mean time from implantation to start of such treatment was 2.7 months. Discussion. The results suggest that many patients with nonmalignant low-back pain could be implanted with a constant-flow pump when their programmable device needs replacing or, in some cases, at the start of intrathecal treatment. This would reduce costs and the requirement for surgery.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)376-380
Number of pages5
JournalNeuromodulation
Volume10
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 2007

Keywords

  • Implantable infusion pumps
  • Intrathecal
  • Low-back pain
  • Programmable

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neurology
  • Clinical Neurology
  • Anesthesiology and Pain Medicine

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