The use of HAART is associated with decreased risk of death during initial treatment of cryptococcal meningitis in adults in Botswana

Gregory P. Bisson, Rudo Nthobatsong, Rameshwari Thakur, Gloria Lesetedi, Kavita Vinekar, Pablo Tebas, John E. Bennett, Stephen Gluckman, Tendani Gaolathe, Rob R. MacGregor

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Objective: The objective of this study was to evaluate outcomes among adults with a first episode of cryptococcal. meningitis (CM), comparing those on highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) with those not on HAART. Methods: We conducted a prospective cohort study among HIVinfected adults (aged 18 years and older) with a first episode of CM at the Princess Marina Hospital, in Gaborone, Botswana. The proportions surviving to discharge were compared. Logistic regression was used, to evaluate the relationship between HAART use and risk of death in the hospital, adjusting for potential confounders. Results: Ninety-two patients [median CD4 41 cells/mm 3 (interquartile range 22-85)] were included, 26 of whom were on HAART at the time that they developed CM. The in-hospital mortality was lower among those on. HAART {2 of 26 (8%) vs 14 of 66 (21%); odds ratio = 0.36 [95% confidence interval (CI) 0.09 to 1.49]}, and this result was statistically significant after adjustment for male sex and tuberculosis [adjusted odds ratio = 0.19 (95% CI 0.04 to 1.00)]. Conclusions: HAART use at the time of a first admission with CM is associated, with decreased risk of death during the acute phase of disease. Reasons for this association should be explored.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)227-229
Number of pages3
JournalJournal of acquired immune deficiency syndromes
Volume49
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 2008

Keywords

  • Africa
  • Cohort study
  • Cryptococcal meningitis
  • HAART

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Infectious Diseases
  • Pharmacology (medical)

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