The use of fundus photographs and fluorescein angiograms in the identification and treatment of choroidal neovascularization in the Macular Photocoagulation Study

J. A. Chamberlin, Neil M Bressler, Susan B Bressler, M. J. Elman, R. P. Murphy, T. P. Flood, Barbara S Hawkins, M. G. Maguire, S. L. Fine

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

The Macular Photocoagulation Study (MPS) Fundus Photograph Reading Center has developed a standard set of methods for assessing color photographs and fluorescein angiograms on study patients. For pretreatment angiograms, these methods are used to determine the location and extent of the choroidal neovascularization. For posttreatment color fundus photographs, these methods are used to assess the extent and intensity of treatment. Although these methods were developed to judge eligibility and treatment of patients enrolled in the MPS, they provide an excellent way for all treating ophthalmologists to evaluate their patients' angiograms and to assess immediately the intensity and extent of laser photocoagulation. The technique requires a microfilm reader or slide projection device to determine the completeness of treatment. The authors superimpose independent drawings made from pre- and posttreatment photographs. The techniques described can be applied readily in clinical practice. Since persistent neovascularization is highly correlated with incomplete and/or inadequate photocoagulation treatment, clinicians may adopt these Reading Center techniques to minimize the frequency of persistent neovascularization and, possibly, to reduce the frequency of visual loss in treated eyes.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1526-1534
Number of pages9
JournalOphthalmology
Volume96
Issue number10
StatePublished - 1989

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Choroidal Neovascularization
Light Coagulation
Fluorescein
Angiography
Reading
Color
Therapeutics
Lasers
Equipment and Supplies

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Ophthalmology

Cite this

The use of fundus photographs and fluorescein angiograms in the identification and treatment of choroidal neovascularization in the Macular Photocoagulation Study. / Chamberlin, J. A.; Bressler, Neil M; Bressler, Susan B; Elman, M. J.; Murphy, R. P.; Flood, T. P.; Hawkins, Barbara S; Maguire, M. G.; Fine, S. L.

In: Ophthalmology, Vol. 96, No. 10, 1989, p. 1526-1534.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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