The use of epinephrine for out-of-hospital treatment of anaphylaxis: Resource document for the national association of ems physicians position statement

Ryan C. Jacobsen, Michael G. Millin

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Anaphylaxis is a potentially life-threatening condition that requires both prompt recognition and treatment with epinephrine. All levels of emergency medical services (EMS) providers, with appropriate physician oversight, should be able to carry and properly administer epinephrine safely when caring for patients with anaphylaxis. EMS systems and EMS medical directors should develop a mechanism to review the charts of patients who received epinephrine and were not in cardiac arrest. This will help to ensure the safe and appropriate use of epinephrine in order to provide continued quality improvement. Despite the safety of epinephrine, EMS systems that carry epinephrine autoinjectors should establish protocols to deal with patients or emergency responders who have an unintentional injection of epinephrine into the hand or digit. Continued research is needed to better define the role that EMS plays in the management of anaphylaxis. This paper serves as a resource document to the National Association of EMS Physician position on the use of epinephrine for the out-of-hospital treatment of anaphylaxis. Key words: EMS; prehospital; anaphylaxis; epinephrine; intramuscular epinephrine

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)570-576
Number of pages7
JournalPrehospital Emergency Care
Volume15
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 1 2011

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Emergency Medicine
  • Emergency

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