The timing of maternal depressive symptoms and mothers' parenting practices with young children: Implications for pediatric practice

Kathryn Taaffe McLearn, Cynthia S Minkovitz, Donna Strobino, Elisabeth Marks, William Hou

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

BACKGROUND. The prevalence of maternal depressive symptoms and its associated consequences on parental behaviors, child health, and development are well documented. Researchers have called for additional work to investigate the effects of the timing of maternal depressive symptoms at various stages in the development of the young child on the emergence of developmentally appropriate parenting practices. For clinicians, data are limited about when or how often to screen for maternal depressive symptoms or how to target anticipatory guidance to address parental needs. PURPOSE. We sought to determine whether concurrent maternal depressive symptoms have a greater effect than earlier depressive symptoms on the emergence of maternal parenting practices at 30 to 33 months in 3 important domains of child safety, development, and discipline. METHODOLOGY. Secondary analyses from the Healthy Steps National Evaluation were conducted for this study. Data sources included a self-administered enrollment questionnaire and computer-assisted telephone interviews with the mother when the Healthy Steps children were 2 to 4 and 30 to 33 months of age. The 30- to 33-month interview provided information about 4 safety practices (ie, always uses car seat, has electric outlet covers, has safety latches on cabinets, and lowered temperature on the water heater), 6 child development practices (ie, talks daily to child while working, plays daily with child, reads daily to child, limits child television and video watching to

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalPediatrics
Volume118
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 2006

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Parenting
Mothers
Depression
Pediatrics
Child Development
Safety
Interviews
Information Storage and Retrieval
Television
Research Personnel
Temperature
Water

Keywords

  • Early childhood
  • Maternal depression
  • Parenting
  • Primary care

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health

Cite this

The timing of maternal depressive symptoms and mothers' parenting practices with young children : Implications for pediatric practice. / McLearn, Kathryn Taaffe; Minkovitz, Cynthia S; Strobino, Donna; Marks, Elisabeth; Hou, William.

In: Pediatrics, Vol. 118, No. 1, 07.2006.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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