The Structure of Interpersonal Traits: Wiggins's Circumplex and the Five-Factor Model

Robert R. McCrae, Paul Costa

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Using a sample of 315 adult men and women, self-reports on Wiggins's revised Interpersonal Adjective Scales were jointly factored with self-reports, peer ratings, and spouse ratings on the NEO Personality Inventory to examine the relations between the two models. Results suggest that the interpersonal circumplex is defined by the two dimensions of Extraversion and Agreeableness, and that the circular ordering of variables is not an artifact of response biases or cognitive schemata. Circumplex and dimensional models appear to complement each other in describing the structure of personality, and both may be useful to social psychologists in understanding interpersonal behavior.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)586-595
Number of pages10
JournalJournal of Personality and Social Psychology
Volume56
Issue number4
StatePublished - Apr 1989
Externally publishedYes

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Self Report
personality
rating
Personality Inventory
Spouses
psychologist
Artifacts
spouse
Personality
artifact
Psychology
trend
Extraversion (Psychology)

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Social Psychology
  • Sociology and Political Science

Cite this

The Structure of Interpersonal Traits : Wiggins's Circumplex and the Five-Factor Model. / McCrae, Robert R.; Costa, Paul.

In: Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, Vol. 56, No. 4, 04.1989, p. 586-595.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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