The stem cell niche: Lessons from the Drosophila testis

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

In metazoans, tissue maintenance and regeneration depend on adult stem cells, which are characterized by their ability to selfrenew and generate differentiating progeny in response to the needs of the tissues in which they reside. In the Drosophila testis, germline and somatic stem cells are housed together in a common niche, where they are regulated by local signals, epigenetic mechanisms and systemic factors. These stem cell populations in the Drosophila testis have the unique advantage of being easy to identify and manipulate, and hence much progress has been made in understanding how this niche operates. Here, we summarize recent work on stem cells in the adult Drosophila testis and discuss the remarkable ability of these stem cells to respond to change within the niche.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)2861-2869
Number of pages9
JournalDevelopment
Volume138
Issue number14
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 15 2011

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Stem Cell Niche
Adult Stem Cells
Drosophila
Testis
Stem Cells
Epigenomics
Regeneration
Maintenance
Population

Keywords

  • Drosophila
  • JAK-STAT
  • Niche
  • Stem cell
  • Testis

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Developmental Biology
  • Molecular Biology

Cite this

The stem cell niche : Lessons from the Drosophila testis. / De Cuevas, Margaret; Matunis, Erika.

In: Development, Vol. 138, No. 14, 15.07.2011, p. 2861-2869.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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