The stagnation of the Mexican male life expectancy in the first decade of the 21st century

The impact of homicides and diabetes mellitus

Vladimir Canudas-Romo, Víctor Manuel García-Guerrero, Carlos Javier Echarri-Cánovas

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Objectives: In the first decade of the 21st century, the Mexican life expectancy changed from a long trend of increase to stagnation. These changes concur with an increase in deaths by homicides that the country experienced in that decade, and an obesity epidemic that had developed over the last decades of the 20th century. We quantify the impact of causes of death on life expectancy from 2000 to 2010. Methods: Two approaches to analyse causes of death are used the number of life years lost due to each of the causes of death in a given year, and causedecomposition techniques for comparisons of life expectancy from 2000 to 2010. Results: The apparent stagnation in life expectancy is the result of an increase in deaths by homicides and diabetes mellitus on the one hand, and the positive improvements observed in other causes of death on the other. The negative impact of homicides is particularly observed for ages 15 and 50, and for that of diabetes mellitus at ages above 45 years. Conclusions: There is little basis for optimism regarding the future scenarios of the health of the Mexican population based on the first decade of the 21st century. Male life expectancy would have increased by 2 years if deaths by homicides and diabetes mellitus had been avoided.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)28-34
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of Epidemiology and Community Health
Volume69
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - 2015
Externally publishedYes

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Homicide
Life Expectancy
Diabetes Mellitus
Cause of Death
Obesity
Health
Population

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Epidemiology
  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

The stagnation of the Mexican male life expectancy in the first decade of the 21st century : The impact of homicides and diabetes mellitus. / Canudas-Romo, Vladimir; García-Guerrero, Víctor Manuel; Echarri-Cánovas, Carlos Javier.

In: Journal of Epidemiology and Community Health, Vol. 69, No. 1, 2015, p. 28-34.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Canudas-Romo, Vladimir ; García-Guerrero, Víctor Manuel ; Echarri-Cánovas, Carlos Javier. / The stagnation of the Mexican male life expectancy in the first decade of the 21st century : The impact of homicides and diabetes mellitus. In: Journal of Epidemiology and Community Health. 2015 ; Vol. 69, No. 1. pp. 28-34.
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