The small population of PIG-A mutant cells in myelodysplastic syndromes do not arise from multipotent hematopoietic stem cells

Jeffrey J. Pu, Rong Hu, Galina L. Mukhina, Hetty E. Carraway, Michael A. McDevitt, Robert A. Brodsky

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Background Patients with paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria harbor clonal glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchor deficient cells arising from a multipotent hematopoietic stem cell acquiring a PIG-A mutation. Many patients with aplastic anemia and myelodysplastic syndromes also harbor small populations of glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchor deficient cells. Patients with aplastic anemia often evolve into paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria; however, myelodysplastic syndromes seldom evolve into paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria. Here, we investigate the origin and clonality of small glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchor deficient cell populations in aplastic anemia and myelodysplastic syndromes. Design and Methods We used peripheral blood flow cytometry to identify glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchor deficient blood cells, a proaerolysin-resistant colony forming cell assay to select glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchor deficient progenitor cells, a novel T-lymphocyte enrichment culture assay with proaerolysin selection to expand glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchor deficient T lymphocytes, and PIG-A gene sequencing assays to identify and analyze PIG-A mutations in patients with aplastic anemia and myelodysplastic syndromes. Results Twelve of 15 aplastic anemia patients were found to harbor a small population of glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchor deficient granulocytes; 11 of them were found to harbor a small population of glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchor deficient erythrocytes, 10 patients were detected to harbor glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchor deficient T lymphocytes, and 3 of them were detected only after T-lymphocyte enrichment in proaerolysin selection. PIG-A mutation analyses on 3 patients showed that all of them harbored a matching PIG-A mutation between CFUGM and enriched T lymphocytes. Two of 26 myelodysplastic syndromes were found to harbor small populations of glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchor deficient granulocytes and erythrocytes transiently. Bone marrow derived CD34+ cells from 4 patients grew proaerolysin-resistant colony forming cells bearing PIG-A mutations. No glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchor deficient T lymphocytes were detected in myelodysplastic syndrome patients. Conclusions In contrast to aplastic anemia and paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria, where PIG-A mutations arise from multipotent hematopoietic stem cells, glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchor deficient cells in myelodysplastic syndromes appear to arise from more committed progenitors.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1225-1233
Number of pages9
JournalHaematologica
Volume97
Issue number8
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 1 2012

Keywords

  • Aplastic anemia
  • Hematopoietic stem cell
  • Myelodysplastic syndrome
  • Paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Hematology

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