The Sleepiness-Induced Lapsing and Cognitive Slowing (SILCS) Model: Predicting fatigue effects on warfighter performance

Kelly Neville, Neal Takamoto, Jonathan French, Steven R. Hursh, Samuel G. Schiflett

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Abstract

The Sleepiness-Induced Lapsing and Cognitive Slowing (SILCS) model is designed to improve the credibility and accuracy of synthetic warfighters used in high fidelity simulation systems. The empirically derived SILCS model describes sleep deprivation and time-of-day effects on performance in terms of the influence of two phenomena - general response slowing and lapsing. The former produces small increases in response time while the latter causes significant increases and errors.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationProceedings of the XIVth Triennial Congress of the International Ergonomics Association and 44th Annual Meeting of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Association, 'Ergonomics for the New Millennium'
Pages57-60
Number of pages4
Publication statusPublished - 2000
Externally publishedYes
EventProceedings of the XIVth Triennial Congress of the International Ergonomics Association and 44th Annual Meeting of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Association, 'Ergonomics for the New Millennnium' - San Diego, CA, United States
Duration: Jul 29 2000Aug 4 2000

Other

OtherProceedings of the XIVth Triennial Congress of the International Ergonomics Association and 44th Annual Meeting of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Association, 'Ergonomics for the New Millennnium'
CountryUnited States
CitySan Diego, CA
Period7/29/008/4/00

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ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Human Factors and Ergonomics

Cite this

Neville, K., Takamoto, N., French, J., Hursh, S. R., & Schiflett, S. G. (2000). The Sleepiness-Induced Lapsing and Cognitive Slowing (SILCS) Model: Predicting fatigue effects on warfighter performance. In Proceedings of the XIVth Triennial Congress of the International Ergonomics Association and 44th Annual Meeting of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Association, 'Ergonomics for the New Millennium' (pp. 57-60)