The shared microbiota of humans and companion animals as evaluated from Staphylococcus carriage sites

Ana M. Misic, Meghan Davis, Amanda S. Tyldsley, Brendan P. Hodkinson, Pam Tolomeo, Baofeng Hu, Irving Nachamkin, Ebbing Lautenbach, Daniel O. Morris, Elizabeth A. Grice

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Background: Staphylococcus aureus and other coagulase-positive staphylococci (CPS) colonize skin and mucous membrane sites and can cause skin and soft tissue infections (SSTIs) in humans and animals. Factors modulating methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) colonization and infection in humans remain unclear, including the role of the greater microbial community and environmental factors such as contact with companion animals. In the context of a parent study evaluating the households of outpatients with community MRSA SSTI, the objectives of this study were 1) to characterize the microbiota that colonizes typical coagulase-positive Staphylococcus spp. carriage sites in humans and their companion pets, 2) to analyze associations between Staphylococcus infection and carriage and the composition and diversity of microbial communities, and 3) to analyze factors that influence sharing of microbiota between pets and humans. Results: We enrolled 25 households containing 56 pets and 30 humans. Sampling locations were matched to anatomical sites cultured by the parent study for MRSA and other CPS. Bacterial microbiota were characterized by sequencing of 16S ribosomal RNA genes. Household membership was strongly associated with microbial communities, in both humans and pets. Pets were colonized with a greater relative abundance of Proteobacteria, whereas people were colonized with greater relative abundances of Firmicutes and Actinobacteria. We did not detect differences in microbiota associated with MRSA SSTI, or carriage of MRSA, S. aureus or CPS. Humans in households without pets were more similar to each other than humans in pet-owning households, suggesting that companion animals may play a role in microbial transfer. We examined changes in microbiota over a 3-month time period and found that pet staphylococcal carriage sites were more stable than human carriage sites. Conclusions: We characterized and identified patterns of microbiota sharing and stability between humans and companion animals. While we did not detect associations with MRSA SSTI, or carriage of MRSA, S. aureus or CPS in this small sample size, larger studies are warranted to fully explore how microbial communities may be associated with and contribute to MRSA and/or CPS colonization, infection, and recurrence.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number2
JournalMicrobiome
Volume3
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 23 2015

Fingerprint

Microbiota
Pets
Staphylococcus
Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus
Coagulase
Soft Tissue Infections
Skin
Staphylococcus aureus
Infection
16S Ribosomal RNA
Proteobacteria
Actinobacteria
rRNA Genes
Sample Size
Statistical Factor Analysis
Mucous Membrane
Outpatients
Recurrence

Keywords

  • 16S rRNA
  • Methicillin-resistant staphylococcus aureus (MRSA)
  • Microbiome
  • Pet
  • Skin and soft tissue infection (SSTI)
  • Staphylococcus

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Microbiology
  • Microbiology (medical)

Cite this

Misic, A. M., Davis, M., Tyldsley, A. S., Hodkinson, B. P., Tolomeo, P., Hu, B., ... Grice, E. A. (2015). The shared microbiota of humans and companion animals as evaluated from Staphylococcus carriage sites. Microbiome, 3(1), [2]. https://doi.org/10.1186/s40168-014-0052-7

The shared microbiota of humans and companion animals as evaluated from Staphylococcus carriage sites. / Misic, Ana M.; Davis, Meghan; Tyldsley, Amanda S.; Hodkinson, Brendan P.; Tolomeo, Pam; Hu, Baofeng; Nachamkin, Irving; Lautenbach, Ebbing; Morris, Daniel O.; Grice, Elizabeth A.

In: Microbiome, Vol. 3, No. 1, 2, 23.01.2015.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Misic, AM, Davis, M, Tyldsley, AS, Hodkinson, BP, Tolomeo, P, Hu, B, Nachamkin, I, Lautenbach, E, Morris, DO & Grice, EA 2015, 'The shared microbiota of humans and companion animals as evaluated from Staphylococcus carriage sites', Microbiome, vol. 3, no. 1, 2. https://doi.org/10.1186/s40168-014-0052-7
Misic, Ana M. ; Davis, Meghan ; Tyldsley, Amanda S. ; Hodkinson, Brendan P. ; Tolomeo, Pam ; Hu, Baofeng ; Nachamkin, Irving ; Lautenbach, Ebbing ; Morris, Daniel O. ; Grice, Elizabeth A. / The shared microbiota of humans and companion animals as evaluated from Staphylococcus carriage sites. In: Microbiome. 2015 ; Vol. 3, No. 1.
@article{432673797b474d00a53eba33ee8aa972,
title = "The shared microbiota of humans and companion animals as evaluated from Staphylococcus carriage sites",
abstract = "Background: Staphylococcus aureus and other coagulase-positive staphylococci (CPS) colonize skin and mucous membrane sites and can cause skin and soft tissue infections (SSTIs) in humans and animals. Factors modulating methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) colonization and infection in humans remain unclear, including the role of the greater microbial community and environmental factors such as contact with companion animals. In the context of a parent study evaluating the households of outpatients with community MRSA SSTI, the objectives of this study were 1) to characterize the microbiota that colonizes typical coagulase-positive Staphylococcus spp. carriage sites in humans and their companion pets, 2) to analyze associations between Staphylococcus infection and carriage and the composition and diversity of microbial communities, and 3) to analyze factors that influence sharing of microbiota between pets and humans. Results: We enrolled 25 households containing 56 pets and 30 humans. Sampling locations were matched to anatomical sites cultured by the parent study for MRSA and other CPS. Bacterial microbiota were characterized by sequencing of 16S ribosomal RNA genes. Household membership was strongly associated with microbial communities, in both humans and pets. Pets were colonized with a greater relative abundance of Proteobacteria, whereas people were colonized with greater relative abundances of Firmicutes and Actinobacteria. We did not detect differences in microbiota associated with MRSA SSTI, or carriage of MRSA, S. aureus or CPS. Humans in households without pets were more similar to each other than humans in pet-owning households, suggesting that companion animals may play a role in microbial transfer. We examined changes in microbiota over a 3-month time period and found that pet staphylococcal carriage sites were more stable than human carriage sites. Conclusions: We characterized and identified patterns of microbiota sharing and stability between humans and companion animals. While we did not detect associations with MRSA SSTI, or carriage of MRSA, S. aureus or CPS in this small sample size, larger studies are warranted to fully explore how microbial communities may be associated with and contribute to MRSA and/or CPS colonization, infection, and recurrence.",
keywords = "16S rRNA, Methicillin-resistant staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), Microbiome, Pet, Skin and soft tissue infection (SSTI), Staphylococcus",
author = "Misic, {Ana M.} and Meghan Davis and Tyldsley, {Amanda S.} and Hodkinson, {Brendan P.} and Pam Tolomeo and Baofeng Hu and Irving Nachamkin and Ebbing Lautenbach and Morris, {Daniel O.} and Grice, {Elizabeth A.}",
year = "2015",
month = "1",
day = "23",
doi = "10.1186/s40168-014-0052-7",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "3",
journal = "Microbiome",
issn = "2049-2618",
publisher = "BioMed Central",
number = "1",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - The shared microbiota of humans and companion animals as evaluated from Staphylococcus carriage sites

AU - Misic, Ana M.

AU - Davis, Meghan

AU - Tyldsley, Amanda S.

AU - Hodkinson, Brendan P.

AU - Tolomeo, Pam

AU - Hu, Baofeng

AU - Nachamkin, Irving

AU - Lautenbach, Ebbing

AU - Morris, Daniel O.

AU - Grice, Elizabeth A.

PY - 2015/1/23

Y1 - 2015/1/23

N2 - Background: Staphylococcus aureus and other coagulase-positive staphylococci (CPS) colonize skin and mucous membrane sites and can cause skin and soft tissue infections (SSTIs) in humans and animals. Factors modulating methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) colonization and infection in humans remain unclear, including the role of the greater microbial community and environmental factors such as contact with companion animals. In the context of a parent study evaluating the households of outpatients with community MRSA SSTI, the objectives of this study were 1) to characterize the microbiota that colonizes typical coagulase-positive Staphylococcus spp. carriage sites in humans and their companion pets, 2) to analyze associations between Staphylococcus infection and carriage and the composition and diversity of microbial communities, and 3) to analyze factors that influence sharing of microbiota between pets and humans. Results: We enrolled 25 households containing 56 pets and 30 humans. Sampling locations were matched to anatomical sites cultured by the parent study for MRSA and other CPS. Bacterial microbiota were characterized by sequencing of 16S ribosomal RNA genes. Household membership was strongly associated with microbial communities, in both humans and pets. Pets were colonized with a greater relative abundance of Proteobacteria, whereas people were colonized with greater relative abundances of Firmicutes and Actinobacteria. We did not detect differences in microbiota associated with MRSA SSTI, or carriage of MRSA, S. aureus or CPS. Humans in households without pets were more similar to each other than humans in pet-owning households, suggesting that companion animals may play a role in microbial transfer. We examined changes in microbiota over a 3-month time period and found that pet staphylococcal carriage sites were more stable than human carriage sites. Conclusions: We characterized and identified patterns of microbiota sharing and stability between humans and companion animals. While we did not detect associations with MRSA SSTI, or carriage of MRSA, S. aureus or CPS in this small sample size, larger studies are warranted to fully explore how microbial communities may be associated with and contribute to MRSA and/or CPS colonization, infection, and recurrence.

AB - Background: Staphylococcus aureus and other coagulase-positive staphylococci (CPS) colonize skin and mucous membrane sites and can cause skin and soft tissue infections (SSTIs) in humans and animals. Factors modulating methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) colonization and infection in humans remain unclear, including the role of the greater microbial community and environmental factors such as contact with companion animals. In the context of a parent study evaluating the households of outpatients with community MRSA SSTI, the objectives of this study were 1) to characterize the microbiota that colonizes typical coagulase-positive Staphylococcus spp. carriage sites in humans and their companion pets, 2) to analyze associations between Staphylococcus infection and carriage and the composition and diversity of microbial communities, and 3) to analyze factors that influence sharing of microbiota between pets and humans. Results: We enrolled 25 households containing 56 pets and 30 humans. Sampling locations were matched to anatomical sites cultured by the parent study for MRSA and other CPS. Bacterial microbiota were characterized by sequencing of 16S ribosomal RNA genes. Household membership was strongly associated with microbial communities, in both humans and pets. Pets were colonized with a greater relative abundance of Proteobacteria, whereas people were colonized with greater relative abundances of Firmicutes and Actinobacteria. We did not detect differences in microbiota associated with MRSA SSTI, or carriage of MRSA, S. aureus or CPS. Humans in households without pets were more similar to each other than humans in pet-owning households, suggesting that companion animals may play a role in microbial transfer. We examined changes in microbiota over a 3-month time period and found that pet staphylococcal carriage sites were more stable than human carriage sites. Conclusions: We characterized and identified patterns of microbiota sharing and stability between humans and companion animals. While we did not detect associations with MRSA SSTI, or carriage of MRSA, S. aureus or CPS in this small sample size, larger studies are warranted to fully explore how microbial communities may be associated with and contribute to MRSA and/or CPS colonization, infection, and recurrence.

KW - 16S rRNA

KW - Methicillin-resistant staphylococcus aureus (MRSA)

KW - Microbiome

KW - Pet

KW - Skin and soft tissue infection (SSTI)

KW - Staphylococcus

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84938484352&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84938484352&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1186/s40168-014-0052-7

DO - 10.1186/s40168-014-0052-7

M3 - Article

C2 - 25705378

AN - SCOPUS:84938484352

VL - 3

JO - Microbiome

JF - Microbiome

SN - 2049-2618

IS - 1

M1 - 2

ER -