The scope of wounds encountered in casualties from the global war on terrorism: From the battlefield to the tertiary treatment facility

Michael T. Mazurek, James R. Ficke

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Injuries seen in Operation Iraqi Freedom range from those that can be managed with nonsurgical wound care only to those requiring amputation or multiple bony and soft-tissue procedures for limb salvage. The contamination and soft-tissue injury caused by exploding ordnance requires an aggressive treatment approach. Severe wounds treated near the battlefield (ie, level II) require meticulous surgical débridement, early fracture stabilization, broad-spectrum antibiotics, and rapid evacuation. Treatment at a level III combat support hospital involves a greater volume of patients and a longer stay because of the presence of Iraqi national patients. In the authors' experience, most US patients requiring surgical treatment were evacuated to a level IV facility (ie, Landstuhl Regional Medical Center) after one or two surgeries. The basic war surgery principles of aggressive resuscitation, early and thorough débridement, short-duration damage-control surgical procedures, and rapid evacuation were critical in our reduction of wound infection rates to below 7% for all admissions.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)S18-S23
JournalJournal of the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons
Volume14
Issue number10
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 2006
Externally publishedYes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery
  • Orthopedics and Sports Medicine

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'The scope of wounds encountered in casualties from the global war on terrorism: From the battlefield to the tertiary treatment facility'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this