The schizophrenia syndrome examples of biological tools for subclassification

Richard Jed Wyatt, Steven G. Potkin, Joel Kleinman, Daniel Weinberger, Daniel J. Luchins, Dilip V. Jeste

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Six biological variables-platelet monoamine oxidase activity, urine phenylethylamine concentration, brain norepinephrine concentration, abnormalities on computerized tomog-raphy, lateralization asymmetries, and the presence or absence of tardive dyskinesia-are used to discriminate possible biological groups of schizophrenic patients. All variables successfully subclassify patients, some into divisions consistent with phenomological, psy-chosocial, or biochemical descriptions or hypotheses of schizophrenia. None of the measures, however, has sufficiently stood the test of time to be of clinical utility.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1-2
Number of pages2
JournalJournal of Nervous and Mental Disease
Volume169
Issue number2
StatePublished - 1981
Externally publishedYes

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Schizophrenia
Phenethylamines
Monoamine Oxidase
Norepinephrine
Blood Platelets
Urine
Brain
Tardive Dyskinesia

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychiatry and Mental health

Cite this

The schizophrenia syndrome examples of biological tools for subclassification. / Wyatt, Richard Jed; Potkin, Steven G.; Kleinman, Joel; Weinberger, Daniel; Luchins, Daniel J.; Jeste, Dilip V.

In: Journal of Nervous and Mental Disease, Vol. 169, No. 2, 1981, p. 1-2.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Wyatt, Richard Jed ; Potkin, Steven G. ; Kleinman, Joel ; Weinberger, Daniel ; Luchins, Daniel J. ; Jeste, Dilip V. / The schizophrenia syndrome examples of biological tools for subclassification. In: Journal of Nervous and Mental Disease. 1981 ; Vol. 169, No. 2. pp. 1-2.
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