The schizophrenia syndrome. Examples of biological tools for subclassification

R. J. Wyatt, S. G. Potkin, Joel Kleinman, Daniel Weinberger, D. J. Luchins, D. V. Jeste

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

Abstract

Six biological variables - platelet monoamine oxidase activity, urine phenylethylamine concentration, brain norepinephrine concentration, abnormalities on computerized tomography, lateralization asymmetries, and the presence or absence of tardive dyskinesia - are used to discriminate possible biological groups of schizophrenic patients. All variables successfully subclassify patients, some into divisions consistent with phenomenological, psychosocial, or biochemical descriptions or hypotheses of schizophrenia. None of the measures, however, has sufficiently stood the test of time to be of clinical utility.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)100-112
Number of pages13
JournalJournal of Nervous and Mental Disease
Volume169
Issue number2
StatePublished - 1981
Externally publishedYes

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Schizophrenia
Phenethylamines
Monoamine Oxidase
Norepinephrine
Blood Platelets
Tomography
Urine
Brain
Tardive Dyskinesia

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychiatry and Mental health

Cite this

The schizophrenia syndrome. Examples of biological tools for subclassification. / Wyatt, R. J.; Potkin, S. G.; Kleinman, Joel; Weinberger, Daniel; Luchins, D. J.; Jeste, D. V.

In: Journal of Nervous and Mental Disease, Vol. 169, No. 2, 1981, p. 100-112.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

Wyatt, R. J. ; Potkin, S. G. ; Kleinman, Joel ; Weinberger, Daniel ; Luchins, D. J. ; Jeste, D. V. / The schizophrenia syndrome. Examples of biological tools for subclassification. In: Journal of Nervous and Mental Disease. 1981 ; Vol. 169, No. 2. pp. 100-112.
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