The Scaffold Immune Microenvironment: Biomaterial-Mediated Immune Polarization in Traumatic and Nontraumatic Applications

Kaitlyn Sadtler, Brian W. Allen, Kenneth Estrellas, Franck Housseau, Andrew Mark Pardoll, Jennifer Hartt Elisseeff

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

The immune system mediates tissue growth and homeostasis and is the first responder to injury or biomaterial implantation. Recently, it has been appreciated that immune cells play a critical role in wound healing and tissue repair and should thus be considered potentially beneficial, particularly in the context of scaffolds for regenerative medicine. In this study, we present a flow cytometric analysis of cellular recruitment to tissue-derived extracellular matrix scaffolds, where we quantitatively describe the infiltration and polarization of several immune subtypes, including macrophages, dendritic cells, neutrophils, monocytes, T cells, and B cells. We define a specific scaffold-associated macrophage (SAM) that expresses CD11b+F4/80+CD11c+/-CD206hiCD86+MHCII+ that are characteristic of an M2-like cell (CD206hi) with high antigen presentation capabilities (MHCII+). Adaptive immune cells tightly regulate the phenotype of a mature SAM. These studies provide a foundation for detailed characterization of the scaffold immune microenvironment of a given biomaterial scaffold to determine the effect of scaffold changes on immune response and subsequent therapeutic outcome of that material.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1044-1053
Number of pages10
JournalTissue Engineering - Part A
Volume23
Issue number19-20
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 1 2017

Fingerprint

Biocompatible Materials
Biomaterials
Scaffolds
Macrophages
Polarization
Scaffolds (biology)
Tissue
Regenerative Medicine
Antigen Presentation
Wound Healing
Dendritic Cells
Extracellular Matrix
Monocytes
Immune System
Neutrophils
Homeostasis
B-Lymphocytes
T-cells
Immune system
T-Lymphocytes

Keywords

  • biomaterial implant
  • extracellular matrix
  • immune polarization
  • macrophages
  • T cells

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Bioengineering
  • Biochemistry
  • Biomaterials
  • Biomedical Engineering

Cite this

The Scaffold Immune Microenvironment : Biomaterial-Mediated Immune Polarization in Traumatic and Nontraumatic Applications. / Sadtler, Kaitlyn; Allen, Brian W.; Estrellas, Kenneth; Housseau, Franck; Pardoll, Andrew Mark; Elisseeff, Jennifer Hartt.

In: Tissue Engineering - Part A, Vol. 23, No. 19-20, 01.10.2017, p. 1044-1053.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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