The role of ubiquitination in Drosophila innate immunity

Rui Zhou, Neal Silverman, Mei Hong, Dorothy S. Liao, Yvonne Chung, Zhijian J. Chen, Tom Maniatis

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Infection of Drosophila by Gram-negative bacteria triggers a signal transduction pathway (the IMD pathway) culminating in the expression of genes encoding antimicrobial peptides. A key component in this pathway is a Drosophila IκB kinase (DmIKK) complex, which stimulates the cleavage and activation of the NF-κB transcription factor Relish. Activation of the DmIKK complex requires the MAP3K dTAK1, but the mechanism of dTAK1 activation is not understood. In human cells, the activation of TAK1 and IKK requires the human ubiquitin-conjugating enzymes Ubc13 and UEV1a. Here we demonstrate that the Drosophila homologs of Ubc13 and UEV1a are similarly required for the activation of dTAK1 and the DmIKK complex. Surprisingly, we find that the Drosophila caspase DREDD and its partner dFADD are required for the activation of DmIKK and JNK, in addition to their role in Relish cleavage. These studies reveal an evolutionarily conserved role of ubiquitination in IKK activation, and provide new insights into the hierarchy of signaling components in the Drosophila antibacterial immunity pathway.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)34048-34055
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of Biological Chemistry
Volume280
Issue number40
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Oct 7 2005
Externally publishedYes

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ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biochemistry
  • Molecular Biology
  • Cell Biology

Cite this

Zhou, R., Silverman, N., Hong, M., Liao, D. S., Chung, Y., Chen, Z. J., & Maniatis, T. (2005). The role of ubiquitination in Drosophila innate immunity. Journal of Biological Chemistry, 280(40), 34048-34055. https://doi.org/10.1074/jbc.M506655200