The role of theory in research to develop and evaluate the implementation of patient safety practices

Robbie Foy, John Ovretveit, Paul G. Shekelle, Peter J. Pronovost, Stephanie L. Taylor, Sydney Dy, Susanne Hempel, Kathryn M. McDonald, Lisa V. Rubenstein, Robert M. Wachter

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Theories provide a way of understanding and predicting the effects of patient safety practices (PSPs), interventions intended to prevent or mitigate harm caused by healthcare or risks of such harm. Yet most published evaluations make little or no explicit reference to theory, thereby hindering efforts to generalise findings from one context to another. Theories from a wide range of disciplines are potentially relevant to research on PSPs. Theory can be used in research to explain clinical and organisational behaviour, to guide the development and selection of PSPs, and in evaluating their implementation and mechanisms of action. One key recommendation from an expert consensus process is that researchers should describe the theoretical basis for chosen intervention components or provide an explicit logic model for 'why this PSP should work.' Future theory-driven evaluations would enhance generalisability and help build a cumulative understanding of the nature of change.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)453-459
Number of pages7
JournalBMJ Quality and Safety
Volume20
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - May 2011

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Patient Safety
Research
Research Personnel
Delivery of Health Care

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Health Policy

Cite this

Foy, R., Ovretveit, J., Shekelle, P. G., Pronovost, P. J., Taylor, S. L., Dy, S., ... Wachter, R. M. (2011). The role of theory in research to develop and evaluate the implementation of patient safety practices. BMJ Quality and Safety, 20(5), 453-459. https://doi.org/10.1136/bmjqs.2010.047993

The role of theory in research to develop and evaluate the implementation of patient safety practices. / Foy, Robbie; Ovretveit, John; Shekelle, Paul G.; Pronovost, Peter J.; Taylor, Stephanie L.; Dy, Sydney; Hempel, Susanne; McDonald, Kathryn M.; Rubenstein, Lisa V.; Wachter, Robert M.

In: BMJ Quality and Safety, Vol. 20, No. 5, 05.2011, p. 453-459.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Foy, R, Ovretveit, J, Shekelle, PG, Pronovost, PJ, Taylor, SL, Dy, S, Hempel, S, McDonald, KM, Rubenstein, LV & Wachter, RM 2011, 'The role of theory in research to develop and evaluate the implementation of patient safety practices', BMJ Quality and Safety, vol. 20, no. 5, pp. 453-459. https://doi.org/10.1136/bmjqs.2010.047993
Foy, Robbie ; Ovretveit, John ; Shekelle, Paul G. ; Pronovost, Peter J. ; Taylor, Stephanie L. ; Dy, Sydney ; Hempel, Susanne ; McDonald, Kathryn M. ; Rubenstein, Lisa V. ; Wachter, Robert M. / The role of theory in research to develop and evaluate the implementation of patient safety practices. In: BMJ Quality and Safety. 2011 ; Vol. 20, No. 5. pp. 453-459.
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