The role of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system in circulatory control and hypertension

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

Abstract

The control of arterial pressure in normal and pathological states is governed by many mechanisms. The renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system is one mechanism which may be activated. The formation of the potent vasoconstrictor angiotensin II and the synthesis of aldosterone provide a means of arterial pressure regulation. With the recent introduction of specific agents which block the renin-angiotensin system, new appreciation of the role of this system is being formed. It is premature to predict whether we, as anaesthetists, will use such agents in our anaesthetic practice. However, we will see some patients who present for surgery taking such medication. How this will influence the patient's response to surgery is unknown. Inhibition of the renin-angiotensin system may allow better perfusion of vital organs. It may, however, be detrimental to the patient who needs this defense mechanism for support of his arterial pressure. At the present time these are all unsettled questions. Through the use of specific inhibitors of the renin-angiotensin system its importance will be defined, much as alpha- and beta-adrenoceptor antagonists have clarified our understanding of the sympathetic nervous system.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)711-718
Number of pages8
JournalBritish Journal of Anaesthesia
Volume53
Issue number7
StatePublished - 1981
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Renin-Angiotensin System
Hypertension
Arterial Pressure
Sympathetic Nervous System
Vasoconstrictor Agents
Aldosterone
Angiotensin II
Adrenergic Receptors
Anesthetics
Perfusion

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Anesthesiology and Pain Medicine

Cite this

The role of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system in circulatory control and hypertension. / Miller, Edward.

In: British Journal of Anaesthesia, Vol. 53, No. 7, 1981, p. 711-718.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

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