The role of patient personality in the identification of depression in older primary care patients

Laura W. McCray, Hillary R. Bogner, Mary D. Sammel, Joseph J. Gallo

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Background: Our aim was to evaluate whether personality factors significantly contribute to the identification of depression in older primary care patients, even after controlling for depressive symptoms. Methods: We examined the association between personality factors and the identification of depression among 318 older adults who participated in the Spectrum study. Results: High neuroticism (unadjusted Odds Ratio (OR) 2.36, 95% Confidence Interval (CI) [1.42, 3.931) and low extraversion (adjusted OR 2.24, CI [1.26, 4.00]) were associated with physician identification of depression. Persons with high conscientiousness were less likely to be identified as depressed by the doctor (adjusted OR 0.45, CI [0.22, 0.91]). Conclusion: Personality factors influence the identification of depression among older persons in primary care over and above the relationship of depressive symptoms with physician identification. Knowledge of personality may influence the diagnosis and treatment of depression in primary care.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1095-1100
Number of pages6
JournalInternational journal of geriatric psychiatry
Volume22
Issue number11
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 2007
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Aged
  • Depression
  • Diagnosis
  • Personality
  • Primary health care

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Geriatrics and Gerontology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

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