The role of early life variables on the risk of fractures from birth to early adolescence: A prospective birth cohort study

P. C. Hallal, F. V. Siqueira, A. M B Menezes, C. L P Araújo, S. A. Norris, C. G. Victora

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

In a prospective cohort from Brazil, we evaluated the incidence of fractures from birth to early adolescence and examined risk factors for fractures. The incidence was 14.2% (95%CI 13.2, 15.2). Male sex, birth length, and maternal age at delivery were positively associated with the risk of fractures. Introduction: This study aims to evaluate the incidence of fractures from birth to 11 years of age and to explore the effect of early life variables on the risk of fractures. Methods: All children (N = 5,249) born in 1993 in the city of Pelotas, Brazil were enrolled in a prospective birth cohort study. In 2004-2005, 87.5% of the cohort members were sought for a follow-up visit. History of fractures, including anatomic site and age of the fracture were asked to mothers. Results: The incidence of fractures from birth to 11 years of age was 14.2% (95%CI 13.2, 15.2). Out of the 628 subjects who experienced a fracture, 91 reported two and only 20 reported three or more fractures. Male sex, birth length, and maternal age at delivery were positively associated with the risk of fractures. No consistent associations were found for family income, maternal body mass index, smoking during pregnancy, and birth weight. Conclusions: Birth length seems to have long-term effect on musculoskeletal health. The higher risk of fractures among children of older mothers needs to be confirmed by other studies. In accordance to the developmental origins of diseases, fractures seem to be, at least in part, programmed in early life.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1873-1879
Number of pages7
JournalOsteoporosis International
Volume20
Issue number11
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 2009
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Epidemiology
  • Fractures
  • Musculoskeletal disorders
  • Prospective studies

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism

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