The role of cockroach allergy and exposure to cockroach allergen in causing morbidity among inner-city children with asthma

David L. Rosenstreich, Peyton Eggleston, Meyer Kattan, Dean Baker, Raymond G. Slavin, Peter Gergen, Herman Mitchell, Kathleen Mcniff-Mortimer, Henry Lynn, Dennis Ownby, Floyd Malveaux

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Background: It has been hypothesized that asthma-related health problems are most severe among children in inner-city areas who are allergic to a specific allergen and also exposed to high levels of that allergen in bedroom dust. Methods: From November 1992 through October 1993, we recruited 476 children with asthma (age, four to nine years) from eight inner-city areas in the United States. Immediate hypersensitivity to cockroach, house-dust-mite, and cat allergens was measured by skin testing. We then measured major allergens of cockroach (Bla g 1), dust mites (Der p 1 and Der f 1), and cat dander (Fel d 1) in household dust using monoclonal-antibody-based enzyme- linked immunosorbent assays. High levels of exposure were defined according to proposed thresholds for causing disease. Data on morbidity due to asthma were collected at base line and over a one-year period. Results: Of the children, 36.8 percent were allergic to cockroach allergen, 34.9 percent to dust-mite allergen, and 22.7 percent to cat allergen. Among the children's bedrooms, 50.2 percent had high levels of cockroach allergen in dust, 9.7 percent had high levels of dust-mite allergen, and 12.6 percent had high levels of cat allergen. After we adjusted for sex, score on the Child Behavior Checklist, and family history of asthma, we found that children who were both allergic to cockroach allergen and exposed to high levels of this allergen had 0.37 hospitalization a year, as compared with 0.11 for the other children (P=0.001), and 2.56 unscheduled medical visits for asthma per year, as compared with 1.43 (P

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1356-1363
Number of pages8
JournalNew England Journal of Medicine
Volume336
Issue number19
DOIs
StatePublished - 1997

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Cockroaches
Allergens
Hypersensitivity
Asthma
Morbidity
Dust
Mites
Cats
Dander
Dermatophagoides Antigens
Immediate Hypersensitivity
Child Behavior
Checklist
Hospitalization
Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay
Monoclonal Antibodies
Skin

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Rosenstreich, D. L., Eggleston, P., Kattan, M., Baker, D., Slavin, R. G., Gergen, P., ... Malveaux, F. (1997). The role of cockroach allergy and exposure to cockroach allergen in causing morbidity among inner-city children with asthma. New England Journal of Medicine, 336(19), 1356-1363. https://doi.org/10.1056/NEJM199705083361904

The role of cockroach allergy and exposure to cockroach allergen in causing morbidity among inner-city children with asthma. / Rosenstreich, David L.; Eggleston, Peyton; Kattan, Meyer; Baker, Dean; Slavin, Raymond G.; Gergen, Peter; Mitchell, Herman; Mcniff-Mortimer, Kathleen; Lynn, Henry; Ownby, Dennis; Malveaux, Floyd.

In: New England Journal of Medicine, Vol. 336, No. 19, 1997, p. 1356-1363.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Rosenstreich, DL, Eggleston, P, Kattan, M, Baker, D, Slavin, RG, Gergen, P, Mitchell, H, Mcniff-Mortimer, K, Lynn, H, Ownby, D & Malveaux, F 1997, 'The role of cockroach allergy and exposure to cockroach allergen in causing morbidity among inner-city children with asthma', New England Journal of Medicine, vol. 336, no. 19, pp. 1356-1363. https://doi.org/10.1056/NEJM199705083361904
Rosenstreich, David L. ; Eggleston, Peyton ; Kattan, Meyer ; Baker, Dean ; Slavin, Raymond G. ; Gergen, Peter ; Mitchell, Herman ; Mcniff-Mortimer, Kathleen ; Lynn, Henry ; Ownby, Dennis ; Malveaux, Floyd. / The role of cockroach allergy and exposure to cockroach allergen in causing morbidity among inner-city children with asthma. In: New England Journal of Medicine. 1997 ; Vol. 336, No. 19. pp. 1356-1363.
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AU - Slavin, Raymond G.

AU - Gergen, Peter

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