The role of basophils in asthma

L. M. Lichtenstein, B. S. Bochner

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

The characteristics of the acute and late human response to antigen in the upper and lower airways and in the skin is summarized in TABLE 2. This table makes it clear that while mast cells are responsible for the mediator release of the acute phase, eosinophils and basophils are the cells involved in the mediator release which occurs during the experimental late phase reaction. The pattern of mediators observed during the acute response is quite characteristic of the mast cell. Thus, in the nose, skin, and lungs, the acute response is characterized by significant increases in histamine, PGD2, tryptase, and sometimes LTC4. In the late phase reaction, the pattern of mediator release is characteristic of basophils and eosinophils, and includes histamine, LTC4 (where measurable), and eosinophil-derived proteins, without PGD2 or tryptase. Basophils have been identified at appropriate time-points in each model using morphologic and phenotypic criteria, and their numbers relate to the histamine levels. Finally, treatment with glucocorticosteroids, the most potent drugs available for treating chronic allergic inflammation, obliterates the late phase reaction and decreases both mediator release and the infiltration of eosinophils and basophils. Chronic allergic inflammation is now taken by both the pulmonary and immunologic community as a hallmark of asthma, and it can be stated without equivocation that the basophils are responsible for the mediator release observed in that response.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)48-61
Number of pages14
JournalAnnals of the New York Academy of Sciences
Volume629
StatePublished - 1991

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Basophils
Histamine
Prostaglandin D2
Tryptases
Leukotriene C4
Asthma
Eosinophils
Skin
Mast Cells
Infiltration
Inflammation
Lung
Antigens
Nose
Pharmaceutical Preparations
Mediator
Proteins
Cells

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)

Cite this

Lichtenstein, L. M., & Bochner, B. S. (1991). The role of basophils in asthma. Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences, 629, 48-61.

The role of basophils in asthma. / Lichtenstein, L. M.; Bochner, B. S.

In: Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences, Vol. 629, 1991, p. 48-61.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Lichtenstein, LM & Bochner, BS 1991, 'The role of basophils in asthma', Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences, vol. 629, pp. 48-61.
Lichtenstein, L. M. ; Bochner, B. S. / The role of basophils in asthma. In: Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences. 1991 ; Vol. 629. pp. 48-61.
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