The Role of ARV Associated Adverse Drug Reactions in Influencing Adherence Among HIV-Infected Individuals: A Systematic Review and Qualitative Meta-Synthesis

Haochu Li, Gifty Marley, Wei Ma, Chongyi Wei, Mellanye Lackey, Qingyan Ma, Françoise Renaud, Marco Vitoria, Rachel Beanland, Meg Doherty, Joseph D. Tucker

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

Abstract

Poor adherence remains a major barrier to achieving the clinical and public health benefits of antiretroviral drugs (ARVs). A systematic review and qualitative meta-synthesis was conduct to evaluate how ARV adverse drug reactions may influence ARV adherence. Thirty-nine articles were identified, and 33 reported that ARV adverse drug reactions decreased adherence and six studies found no influence. Visually noticeable adverse drug reactions and psychological adverse reactions were reported as more likely to cause non-adherence compared to other adverse drug reactions. Six studies reported a range of adverse reactions associated with EFV-containing regimens contributing to decreased adherence. Informing HIV-infected individuals about ARV adverse drug reactions prior to initiation, counselling about coping mechanisms, and experiencing the effectiveness of ARVs on wellbeing may improve ARV adherence.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)341-351
Number of pages11
JournalAIDS and behavior
Volume21
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 1 2017
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Adherence
  • Adverse drug reaction
  • Antiretroviral
  • HIV
  • Qualitative meta-synthesis

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Social Psychology
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Infectious Diseases

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