The rise of human in vivo NMR spectroscopy

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

NMR spectroscopy and NMR imaging with magnetic field gradients make strange bedfellows, the requirements for one seemingly ruling out the other for human applications. Nevertheless, their stories are intertwined; the advent of high field imaging systems arose because of the desire for human spectroscopy. Localized spectroscopy is possible because of NMR imaging. Both have links to physics at Nottingham, at least in the personalized account that follows. Today, virtually all NMR spectroscopy experiments can be conceived with a localized in vivo spectroscopy counterpart.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)29-40
Number of pages12
JournalSolid State Nuclear Magnetic Resonance
Volume9
Issue number1
StatePublished - Nov 1997

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Nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy
Spectroscopy
nuclear magnetic resonance
spectroscopy
Imaging systems
Physics
Magnetic fields
Experiments
gradients
requirements
physics
magnetic fields
Magnetic Resonance Imaging

Keywords

  • Human
  • NMR
  • Spectroscopy

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Physical and Theoretical Chemistry
  • Spectroscopy
  • Electronic, Optical and Magnetic Materials

Cite this

The rise of human in vivo NMR spectroscopy. / Bottomley, Paul A.

In: Solid State Nuclear Magnetic Resonance, Vol. 9, No. 1, 11.1997, p. 29-40.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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