The retroisthmic cleft: Scintigraphic appearance and clinical relevance in patients with low back pain

Titus Abraham, Lawrence Holder, Charles E Silberstein

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

This article describes the scintigraphic appearance of both a symptomatic and asymptomatic retroisthmic cleft in two athletes with low back pain. This lesion, which involves the lamina, is the least common of the neural arch defects of which spondylolysis is the most common. The anatomy of the lesion is discussed and illustrated. The literature about the possible cause of these lesions is reviewed. The report emphasizes the valuable role of radionuclide bone imaging in patients who have pain of potentially osseous origin, and who have a lesion of uncertain physiologic significance seen on an anatomic study such as a plain x-ray, CT scan, or MRI.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)161-165
Number of pages5
JournalClinical Nuclear Medicine
Volume22
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - 1997

Fingerprint

Spondylolysis
Low Back Pain
Radionuclide Imaging
Athletes
Anatomy
Magnetic Resonance Imaging
X-Rays
Bone and Bones
Pain

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Radiology Nuclear Medicine and imaging
  • Radiological and Ultrasound Technology

Cite this

The retroisthmic cleft : Scintigraphic appearance and clinical relevance in patients with low back pain. / Abraham, Titus; Holder, Lawrence; Silberstein, Charles E.

In: Clinical Nuclear Medicine, Vol. 22, No. 3, 1997, p. 161-165.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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