Die bedeutung der posttraumatischen entzündungsreaktion im verletzten gehirn

Translated title of the contribution: The relevance of the inflammatory response in the injured brain

O. I. Schmidt, I. Leinhase, Erik Anton Hasenboehler, S. J. Morgan, P. F. Stahel

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Research efforts in recent years have defined traumatic brain injury (TBI) as a predominantly immunological and inflammatory disorder. This perception is based on the fact that the overwhelming neuroinflammatory response in the injured brain contributes to the development of posttraumatic edema and to neuropathological sequelae which are, in large part, responsible for the adverse outcome. While the "key" mediators of neuroinflammation, such as the cytokine cascade and the complement system, have been clearly defined by studies in experimental TBI models, their exact pathways of interaction and pathophysiological implications remain to be further elucidated. This lack of knowledge is partially due to the concept of a "dual role" of the neuroinflammatory response after TBI. This notion implies that specific inflammatory molecules may mediate diverse functions depending on their local concentration and kinetics of expression in the injured brain. The inflammation-induced effects range from beneficial aspects of neuroprotection to detrimental neurotoxicity. The lack of success in pushing anti-inflammatory therapeutic concepts from"bench to bedside" for patients with severe TBI strengthens the further need for advances in basic research on the molecular aspects of the neuroinflammatory network in the injured brain. The present review summarizes the current knowledge from experimental studies in this field of research and discusses potential future targets of investigation.

Original languageGerman
Pages (from-to)248-258
Number of pages11
JournalOrthopade
Volume36
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 2007
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Brain
Research
Edema
Anti-Inflammatory Agents
Cytokines
Inflammation
Traumatic Brain Injury
Therapeutics
Neuroprotection

Keywords

  • Basic research
  • Brain injury
  • Cerebral edema
  • Experimental model
  • Neuroinflammation

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery
  • Orthopedics and Sports Medicine

Cite this

Die bedeutung der posttraumatischen entzündungsreaktion im verletzten gehirn. / Schmidt, O. I.; Leinhase, I.; Hasenboehler, Erik Anton; Morgan, S. J.; Stahel, P. F.

In: Orthopade, Vol. 36, No. 3, 03.2007, p. 248-258.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Schmidt, O. I. ; Leinhase, I. ; Hasenboehler, Erik Anton ; Morgan, S. J. ; Stahel, P. F. / Die bedeutung der posttraumatischen entzündungsreaktion im verletzten gehirn. In: Orthopade. 2007 ; Vol. 36, No. 3. pp. 248-258.
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