The relationships among sexually transmitted infection, depression, and lifetime violence in a sample of predominantly African American women

Kathryn Laughon, Andrea Gielen, Jacquelyn C Campbell, Jessica Burke, Karen McDonnell, Patricia O'Campo

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

This study was a secondary analysis of the relationships among lifetime experiences of violence, depressive symptoms, substance use, safer sex behaviors use, and past-year sexually transmitted infection (STI) treatment among a sample of 445 low income, primarily African American women (257 HIV-, 188 HIV+) reporting a male Intimate partner within the past year. Twenty-one percent of HIV- and 33% of HIV+ women reported past-year STI treatment. Violence victimization Increased women's odds of past-year STI treatment, controlling for HIV status and age. Depressive symptoms Increased, and use of safer sex behaviors decreased, women's odds of past-year STI treatment. Results suggest that positive assessment for violence and/or depression indicates need for STI screening.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)413-428
Number of pages16
JournalResearch in Nursing and Health
Volume30
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 2007

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Sexually Transmitted Diseases
Violence
African Americans
HIV
Depression
Safe Sex
Sexual Behavior
Crime Victims
Therapeutics

Keywords

  • HIV
  • Sexually transmitted diseases
  • Violence
  • Women

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Nursing(all)

Cite this

The relationships among sexually transmitted infection, depression, and lifetime violence in a sample of predominantly African American women. / Laughon, Kathryn; Gielen, Andrea; Campbell, Jacquelyn C; Burke, Jessica; McDonnell, Karen; O'Campo, Patricia.

In: Research in Nursing and Health, Vol. 30, No. 4, 08.2007, p. 413-428.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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