The relationship of school strain to school functioning and self-worth among urban African American early adolescents

L. Mickey Fenzel, Philip R. Magaletta, Mark F. Peyrot

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

    Abstract

    Fitting the environment of a school to the developmental needs of early adolescents is particularly important for inner-city African American students who tend to drop out of school in large numbers. The present study examined the person-environment fit in terms of the relation of school strain to self-worth and three indicators of school functioning - scholastic competence, intrinsic motivation, and grade point average - among 102 subjects enrolled in an academic intervention program. Results showed a consistent relation of peer strain to self-worth during the Fall and Spring and strong relations in the Spring of strain associated with teacher relations and school demands to scholastic competence and intrinsic motivation. Furthermore, strain increased during the year, and males experienced greater peer strain than did females. Results are discussed in light of previous research on effective middle schools and the developmental needs of urban African American early adolescents.

    Original languageEnglish (US)
    Pages (from-to)279-288
    Number of pages10
    JournalPsychology in the Schools
    Volume34
    Issue number3
    DOIs
    StatePublished - Jul 1997

    ASJC Scopus subject areas

    • Education
    • Developmental and Educational Psychology

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