The relationship of rapid serial naming and word reading in normally developing readers: An exploratory model

Laurie E. Cutting, Martha Bridge Denckla

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Even though researchers have established that rapid serial naming (RSN), or the ability to name within a restricted category of visual stimuli quickly, is a significant predictor of word reading, the predictive nature of RSN is not well understood. To investigate the relationship of RSN and other variables thought to contribute to beginning word reading (phonological awareness, orthographic knowledge, memory span, processing speed, and articulation), a preliminary/exploratory model of word reading was developed and then tested by path analysis. Results indicated that no variable in the model could fully 'explain' RSN; processing speed, but not articulation, contributed to RSN performance. RSN and orthographic knowledge were significantly related, but this relationship was due to the effects of processing speed. In terms of their unique contributions to the variance in word reading, RSN, phonological awareness, and orthographic knowledge were independent of each other. While these results pertain only to normal readers and are preliminary in nature, they may provide a basis for a clear interpretation of similar studies conducted with both normal and dyslexic readers.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)673-705
Number of pages33
JournalReading and Writing
Volume14
Issue number7-8
StatePublished - 2001

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Reading
Aptitude
path analysis
Names
stimulus
Research Personnel
interpretation
ability
performance

Keywords

  • Articulation
  • Orthographic knowledge
  • Phonological awareness
  • Processing speed
  • Rapid automatized naming
  • Rapid serial naming
  • Reading

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Education

Cite this

The relationship of rapid serial naming and word reading in normally developing readers : An exploratory model. / Cutting, Laurie E.; Denckla, Martha Bridge.

In: Reading and Writing, Vol. 14, No. 7-8, 2001, p. 673-705.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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