The relationship of dietary fat and cholesterol to mortality in 10 years: The honolulu heart program

Daniel Mcgee, Dwayne Reed, Grant Stemmerman, George Rhoads, Katsuhiko Yano, Manning Feinleib

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

McGee D (Agent Orange Project, Centers for Disease Control, C-5A, Atlanta, Ga 30333, USA), Reed D, Stemmerman G, Rhoads G, Yano K and Feinleib M. The relationship of dietary fat and cholesterol to mortality in 10 years: The Honolulu Heart Program. International Journal of Epidemiology 1985, 14: 97-105.This report examines the relationship of dietary fat and dietary cholesterol to mortality during a 10-year surveillance of a cohort of men of Japanese descent residing in Hawaii. The consumption of dietary fat (measured in grams) is related inversely and significantly to total mortality. No significant relationships exist between grams of dietary fat and any of the specific causes of death examined. No significant relationships are found between dietary saturated fatty acids (SFA, measured in grams) or dietary cholesterol (measured in milligrams) and any of the specific causes of death examined. In contrast, percentage of calories as fat is related inversely not only to total mortality, but to cancer mortality and to stroke mortality; and it is related directly to coronary heart disease (CHD) mortality. Percentage of calories as SFA is related inversely to cancer mortality and to stroke mortality, and it is related directly to CHD mortality. Only the relationship to stroke mortality remains significant in multivariate analysis if calories from alcohol are excluded from the computation. Dietary cholesterol per 1000 calories is related directly to CHD mortality.While these data provide support for the diet-heart hypothesis, they also suggest that men with low fat intakes have a higher total mortality rate than men with higher fat intakes. This increased risk, due to anexcess risk of death from stroke and cancer, indicates that there is no overall beneficial effect from a low fat diet in this cohort.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)97-105
Number of pages9
JournalInternational Journal of Epidemiology
Volume14
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 1985
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Dietary Cholesterol
Cholesterol
Dietary Fats
Oils and fats
Mortality
Stroke
Coronary Heart Disease
Nutrition
Cancer
Coronary Disease
Saturated fatty acids
Fats
Disease control
Epidemiology
Percentage
Relationships
Heart
Cause of Death
Alcohols
Mortality Rate

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Statistics, Probability and Uncertainty
  • Applied Mathematics
  • Physiology (medical)
  • Reproductive Medicine
  • Obstetrics and Gynecology
  • Epidemiology

Cite this

The relationship of dietary fat and cholesterol to mortality in 10 years : The honolulu heart program. / Mcgee, Daniel; Reed, Dwayne; Stemmerman, Grant; Rhoads, George; Yano, Katsuhiko; Feinleib, Manning.

In: International Journal of Epidemiology, Vol. 14, No. 1, 03.1985, p. 97-105.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Mcgee, Daniel ; Reed, Dwayne ; Stemmerman, Grant ; Rhoads, George ; Yano, Katsuhiko ; Feinleib, Manning. / The relationship of dietary fat and cholesterol to mortality in 10 years : The honolulu heart program. In: International Journal of Epidemiology. 1985 ; Vol. 14, No. 1. pp. 97-105.
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