The relationship of body size to participation and success in a fruits and vegetables intervention among low-income women

Ann C. Klassen, Elizabeth Garrett-Mayer, Peter S. Houts, Sharada Shankar, Celeste M. Torio

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

We examined participation and dietary change among women participants in a community-based nutrition education program, to determine whether intervention results differed by participant body size. Four dietary indicators (daily servings of fruits and vegetables, total calories, calories from fat, and Healthy Eating Index score) were assessed from 24-h recalls taken before, immediately after, and 4 months after a seven-session nutritional education program, from 156 African-American women age 20-50, in Washington, D.C. public housing. Knowledge, attitudes and practices related to nutritional behavior change were collected at three timepoints as well. Random effect models were used to examine dietary patterns, and compare change by body size and class attendance. Results showed that obese women (BMI ≥ 30) had more psychosocial barriers to dietary change and poorer baseline diets, but stronger program attendance. Post-intervention, both groups consumed approximately 250 fewer calories and 2.5% fewer calories from fat. At follow-up, non-obese women consumed significantly fewer calories; obese women consumed significantly fewer calories from fat, and showed significant improvement in HEI. Given the prevalence of obesity in low resource communities, nutritional interventions should tailor strategies to participant body size and related psychosocial needs.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)78-89
Number of pages12
JournalJournal of Community Health
Volume33
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 1 2008

Keywords

  • African-American
  • Dietary change
  • Fruits and vegetables
  • Intervention
  • Nutrition education
  • Obesity

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Health(social science)
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

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