The relationship between risk factors for affective depression in hospitalised stroke patients

P. L P Morris, R. G. Robinson, B. Raphael, Jack Samuels, P. Molloy

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

The influence of psychiatric risk factors on the development of depression following stroke was examined in 88 patients undergoing inpatient rehabilitation. In this sample, 34 patients (38%) had a diagnosis of major or minor depression. Older age and a personal or family history of affective or anxiety disorder were associated significantly with major depression. Minor depression was more common among males and those patients with greater physical disability. Severity of depressive symptoms was associated with a personal or family history of affective or anxiety disorder and higher pre-stroke personality neuroticism. We conclude that certain psychiatric risk factors for affective disorder are strongly associated with poststroke depression. The implications of these findings for anticipating and managing poststroke depression are discussed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)208-217
Number of pages10
JournalAustralian and New Zealand Journal of Psychiatry
Volume26
Issue number2
StatePublished - 1992
Externally publishedYes

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Stroke
Depression
Mood Disorders
Anxiety Disorders
Psychiatry
Personality
Inpatients
Rehabilitation

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychiatry and Mental health

Cite this

The relationship between risk factors for affective depression in hospitalised stroke patients. / Morris, P. L P; Robinson, R. G.; Raphael, B.; Samuels, Jack; Molloy, P.

In: Australian and New Zealand Journal of Psychiatry, Vol. 26, No. 2, 1992, p. 208-217.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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