The relationship between religious beliefs and behaviours and changes in Spiritual Health Locus of Control over time in a national sample of African-Americans

Eddie M. Clark, Jin Huang, David L Roth, Emily Schulz, Beverly R. Williams, Cheryl L. Holt

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Using data from a sample of African-Americans, the present study examined the role of religious beliefs and behaviours in predicting changes in Spiritual Health Locus of Control (SHLOC), or beliefs about the role that God plays in a person’s health. A national sample of African-American adults was recruited using a telephone survey and re-contacted 2.5 years later. Overall, results indicated that both higher religious beliefs and behaviours predicted increases in Active SHLOC, or the view that one collaboratively works with God to maintain one’s health. However, only religious behaviours predicted increases in Passive SHLOC, or the view that because God is in complete control of health that one’s own behaviours are unnecessary. Among men, religious beliefs predicted strengthening Active SHLOC beliefs, while religious behaviours predicted growing Passive SHLOC beliefs. Among women, religious behaviours predicted strengthening Active and Passive SHLOC beliefs.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)449-463
Number of pages15
JournalMental Health, Religion and Culture
Volume20
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - May 28 2017

Keywords

  • African-Americans
  • health
  • locus of control
  • Religiosity

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Psychology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

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