The relationship between primary care and life chances.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Many researchers criticize clinical medicine for its failure to improve mortality rates. But in their critiques, few distinguish primary care from expensive, high-technology specialized care. This research is concerned with the empirical relationship between the availability of health services resources (i.e., primary care, specialty care, hospital beds) and certain "life chances," as measured by overall and disease-specific mortality rates, and life expectancy. The model shows a significant direct association between primary care and favorable mortality outcomes, though the same does not hold true for variables such as hospital beds or physician specialists. There should be greater emphasis on prevention-oriented primary care as a mechanism for health improvement and cost control.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)321-335
Number of pages15
JournalJournal of Health Care for the Poor and Underserved
Volume3
Issue number2
StatePublished - Sep 1992
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Primary Health Care
Mortality
mortality
Health Services Accessibility
Cost Control
Health Resources
Clinical Medicine
Life Expectancy
Health Care Costs
high technology
Research Personnel
life expectancy
Technology
Physicians
health service
Research
physician
medicine
Disease
costs

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Health Policy
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Social Sciences (miscellaneous)

Cite this

The relationship between primary care and life chances. / Shi, Leiyu.

In: Journal of Health Care for the Poor and Underserved, Vol. 3, No. 2, 09.1992, p. 321-335.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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