The relationship between objectively measured sleep disturbance and dementia family caregiver distress and burden

Sherry A. Beaudreau, Adam P. Spira, Heather L. Gray, James Long, Mark Rothkopf, Dolores Gallagher-Thompson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

The aim of this study was to determine whether distress and burden were associated with objective measures of sleep disturbance in dementia caregivers. Using wrist actigraphy, sleep was measured in 60 female, Caucasian dementia family caregivers (mean age, 64.8 years). Caregivers completed questionnaires about demographics, health, depression, duration of caregiving and care recipient nighttime behavior. Care recipients completed a mental status exam. We investigated whether these measures were associated with actigraphic sleep parameters. Greater depressive symptoms among caregivers were associated with poorer sleep efficiency. Older caregiver age and poorer self-rated health were associated with longer time in bed. Sleep disturbance, which is common among dementia caregivers, might be an important index of caregiver distress (ie, depression) but might not be associated with burden (based on the care recipient's general cognitive impairment or nighttime awakenings.)

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)159-165
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of Geriatric Psychiatry and Neurology
Volume21
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 2008

Keywords

  • Actigraphy
  • Caregiving
  • Dementia
  • Sleep

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Neurology
  • Geriatrics and Gerontology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

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