The Relationship Between Neighborhood Disorder and Barriers to Cessation in a Sample of Impoverished Inner-City Smokers in Baltimore, Maryland, United States

Carl A Latkin, Ryan David Kennedy, Melissa Davey-Rothwell, Tuo Yen Tseng, Lauren Czaplicki, Anirudh Baddela, Catie Edwards, Geetanjali Chander, Meghan Moran, Amy Ruth Knowlton

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Introduction: Economic disparities in rates of smoking have been well documented in many countries. These disparities exist on an individual and geographic or neighborhood level. This cross-sectional study examined the relationship between neighborhood physical and social disorder and barriers to smoking cessation among an impoverished urban sample. Methods: A sample of current smokers were recruited through street outreach, posted advertisements, and word of mouth from impoverished neighborhoods in Baltimore, Maryland, USA for a study of psychosocial factors and smoking behaviors. Neighborhood disorder was assessed with a 10-item scale from the Block Environmental Inventory and barriers to cessation with a 9-item scale. Results: In the multiple logistic regression model, perceived stress (aOR = 1.60, 95% CI = 1.32 to 1.95), neighborhood disorder (aOR= 1.34, 95% CI = 1.11 to 1.63), and level of nicotine dependence (aOR = 1.97), 95% CI = 1.62 to 2.40) were all strongly associated with barriers to cessation. Conclusion: The results of this study suggest that neighborhood disorder may lead to barriers to cessation among low-income populations. The findings also indicate that tobacco control interventions should examine and address social and physical aspects of impoverished neighborhoods. Implications: In many countries, tobacco control programs and policies have been less effective among low-income populations as compared to more affluent populations. Little is known about how neighborhood factors influence smoking cessation. This study examined the relationship between neighborhood disorder and barriers to cessation among a low-income population. We recruited a convenience sample of hard-to-reach cigarette smokers from low-income neighborhoods. Even after controlling for level of nicotine dependence and stress, neighborhood disorder was found to be associated with barriers to cessation. The findings suggest the important role of neighborhood disorder as a barrier to smoking cessation.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1451-1456
Number of pages6
JournalNicotine & tobacco research : official journal of the Society for Research on Nicotine and Tobacco
Volume20
Issue number12
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 15 2018

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

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