The relationship between external contact and unmarried adolescents' and young adults' traditional beliefs in Three East Asian Cities: A cross-sectional analysis

Yan Cheng, Chaohua Lou, Ersheng Gao, Mark Ross Emerson, Laurie S. Zabin

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Purpose: There is growing contact with the outside world among adolescents and young adults in the three Asian cities of Hanoi, Vietnam, Shanghai, mainland China, and Taipei, Taiwan because of the open policies implemented by the national governments of each of these cities. Because these policies were enacted at different points in time, their concomitant social impact has not been simultaneous, with the result that these societies are at different stages of change. The goal of this current analysis is to examine the dimensions of external contact and respondents' departures from Confucian valuesfor example, embracing individualism, a woman's taking the initiative in expressing affection to a man, and permissiveness toward premarital sexamong unmarried adolescents and young adults in these three cities and the potential relationship between them. This will contribute to our understanding of contemporary Asian adolescents' and young adults' attitudes during different social transition periods, attitudes that are frequently contrary to traditional Confucian principles. Methods: This is a cross-sectional study. The multicenter survey of 17,016 male and female adolescents and young adults aged 1524 years from three cities with Confucian-influenced culturesShanghai, Hanoi, and Taipeiwas conducted from May 2006 to January 2007 through face-to-face interviews coupled with computer-assisted self-interviews for sensitive questions; 16,554 unmarried respondents were included in this analysis. Binary logistic regression and general linear models were used to explore the associations between respondents' external contact and their nontraditional attitudes. All the analyses were done through SAS 9.1. Results: There were significant differences in the positive association between respondents' external contact and non-Confucian values among adolescents in the three cities. More respondents in Taipei and Shanghai had external contact and identified with nontraditional values than those in Hanoi. The percentages of respondents reporting non-Confucian values were the highest in Taipei and the lowest in Hanoi. The analysis presented significant associations between respondents' exposure to Western culture and their adoption of nontraditional values across the three cities. Respondents who spoke Western languages and who preferred Western videos/actors/singers were more likely to exhibit Western individualism, concurrence with women taking the initiative in a romantic relationship with a man, and permissiveness toward premarital sexual behavior. Conclusions: Although these Asian cities are at different stages of social transition, exposure to Western culture is associated with unmarried adolescents' and young adults' departure from traditional Confucian social rules in all three.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalJournal of Adolescent Health
Volume50
Issue number3 SUPPL.
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 2012

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Young Adult
Cross-Sectional Studies
Permissiveness
Interviews
Surveys and Questionnaires
Singing
Federal Government
Vietnam
Social Change
Taiwan
Sexual Behavior
Linear Models
China
Language
Logistic Models

Keywords

  • Asian city
  • Confucian values
  • External contact
  • Multicenter study
  • Unmarried adolescents and young adults

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health
  • Psychiatry and Mental health
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Cite this

The relationship between external contact and unmarried adolescents' and young adults' traditional beliefs in Three East Asian Cities : A cross-sectional analysis. / Cheng, Yan; Lou, Chaohua; Gao, Ersheng; Emerson, Mark Ross; Zabin, Laurie S.

In: Journal of Adolescent Health, Vol. 50, No. 3 SUPPL., 03.2012.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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T1 - The relationship between external contact and unmarried adolescents' and young adults' traditional beliefs in Three East Asian Cities

T2 - A cross-sectional analysis

AU - Cheng, Yan

AU - Lou, Chaohua

AU - Gao, Ersheng

AU - Emerson, Mark Ross

AU - Zabin, Laurie S.

PY - 2012/3

Y1 - 2012/3

N2 - Purpose: There is growing contact with the outside world among adolescents and young adults in the three Asian cities of Hanoi, Vietnam, Shanghai, mainland China, and Taipei, Taiwan because of the open policies implemented by the national governments of each of these cities. Because these policies were enacted at different points in time, their concomitant social impact has not been simultaneous, with the result that these societies are at different stages of change. The goal of this current analysis is to examine the dimensions of external contact and respondents' departures from Confucian valuesfor example, embracing individualism, a woman's taking the initiative in expressing affection to a man, and permissiveness toward premarital sexamong unmarried adolescents and young adults in these three cities and the potential relationship between them. This will contribute to our understanding of contemporary Asian adolescents' and young adults' attitudes during different social transition periods, attitudes that are frequently contrary to traditional Confucian principles. Methods: This is a cross-sectional study. The multicenter survey of 17,016 male and female adolescents and young adults aged 1524 years from three cities with Confucian-influenced culturesShanghai, Hanoi, and Taipeiwas conducted from May 2006 to January 2007 through face-to-face interviews coupled with computer-assisted self-interviews for sensitive questions; 16,554 unmarried respondents were included in this analysis. Binary logistic regression and general linear models were used to explore the associations between respondents' external contact and their nontraditional attitudes. All the analyses were done through SAS 9.1. Results: There were significant differences in the positive association between respondents' external contact and non-Confucian values among adolescents in the three cities. More respondents in Taipei and Shanghai had external contact and identified with nontraditional values than those in Hanoi. The percentages of respondents reporting non-Confucian values were the highest in Taipei and the lowest in Hanoi. The analysis presented significant associations between respondents' exposure to Western culture and their adoption of nontraditional values across the three cities. Respondents who spoke Western languages and who preferred Western videos/actors/singers were more likely to exhibit Western individualism, concurrence with women taking the initiative in a romantic relationship with a man, and permissiveness toward premarital sexual behavior. Conclusions: Although these Asian cities are at different stages of social transition, exposure to Western culture is associated with unmarried adolescents' and young adults' departure from traditional Confucian social rules in all three.

AB - Purpose: There is growing contact with the outside world among adolescents and young adults in the three Asian cities of Hanoi, Vietnam, Shanghai, mainland China, and Taipei, Taiwan because of the open policies implemented by the national governments of each of these cities. Because these policies were enacted at different points in time, their concomitant social impact has not been simultaneous, with the result that these societies are at different stages of change. The goal of this current analysis is to examine the dimensions of external contact and respondents' departures from Confucian valuesfor example, embracing individualism, a woman's taking the initiative in expressing affection to a man, and permissiveness toward premarital sexamong unmarried adolescents and young adults in these three cities and the potential relationship between them. This will contribute to our understanding of contemporary Asian adolescents' and young adults' attitudes during different social transition periods, attitudes that are frequently contrary to traditional Confucian principles. Methods: This is a cross-sectional study. The multicenter survey of 17,016 male and female adolescents and young adults aged 1524 years from three cities with Confucian-influenced culturesShanghai, Hanoi, and Taipeiwas conducted from May 2006 to January 2007 through face-to-face interviews coupled with computer-assisted self-interviews for sensitive questions; 16,554 unmarried respondents were included in this analysis. Binary logistic regression and general linear models were used to explore the associations between respondents' external contact and their nontraditional attitudes. All the analyses were done through SAS 9.1. Results: There were significant differences in the positive association between respondents' external contact and non-Confucian values among adolescents in the three cities. More respondents in Taipei and Shanghai had external contact and identified with nontraditional values than those in Hanoi. The percentages of respondents reporting non-Confucian values were the highest in Taipei and the lowest in Hanoi. The analysis presented significant associations between respondents' exposure to Western culture and their adoption of nontraditional values across the three cities. Respondents who spoke Western languages and who preferred Western videos/actors/singers were more likely to exhibit Western individualism, concurrence with women taking the initiative in a romantic relationship with a man, and permissiveness toward premarital sexual behavior. Conclusions: Although these Asian cities are at different stages of social transition, exposure to Western culture is associated with unmarried adolescents' and young adults' departure from traditional Confucian social rules in all three.

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KW - Confucian values

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KW - Multicenter study

KW - Unmarried adolescents and young adults

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