The Relationship Between Brand-Specific Alcohol Advertising on Television and Brand-Specific Consumption Among Underage Youth

Craig S. Ross, Emily Maple, Michael Siegel, William Dejong, Timothy S. Naimi, Joshua Ostroff, Alisa A. Padon, Dina L G Borzekowski, David H. Jernigan

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Being able to investigate the relationship between underage drinkers' preferences for particular brands and their exposure to advertising for those brands would represent a significant advance in alcohol marketing research. However, no previous national study has examined the relationship between underage youth exposure to brand-specific alcohol advertising and consumption of those brands. Methods: We conducted a cross-sectional, Internet-based survey of a national sample of 1,031 youth, ages 13-20, who had consumed at least 1 drink of alcohol in the past 30 days. We ascertained all alcohol brands consumed by respondents in the past 30 days. The main outcome measure was brand-specific consumption during the past 30 days, measured as a dichotomous variable. The main predictor variable was exposure to brand-specific alcohol advertising on television. The respondents reported which of 20 television shows popular with youth they had watched during the past 30 days. For each respondent, we calculated a standard measure of potential exposure to the brand-specific alcohol advertising that aired on those shows during the preceding 12 months, based on Nielsen (New York, NY) estimates of the youth audience for each show's telecasts. Results: Compared to no brand-specific advertising exposure, any exposure was associated with an increased likelihood of brand-specific consumption (adjusted odds ratio 3.02; 95% confidence interval: 2.61-3.49) after controlling for several individual- and brand-level variables. When measured as a continuous variable, the relationship between advertising exposure and brand consumption was nonlinear, with a large association at lower levels of exposure and diminishing incremental effects as the level of exposure increased. Conclusions: There is a robust relationship between youth's brand-specific exposure to alcohol advertising on television and their consumption of those same alcohol brands during the past 30 days. This study provides further evidence of a strong association between alcohol advertising and youth drinking behavior.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)2234-2242
Number of pages9
JournalAlcoholism: Clinical and Experimental Research
Volume38
Issue number8
DOIs
StatePublished - 2014

Fingerprint

Television
Marketing
Alcohols
Alcohol Drinking
Drinking Behavior
Internet
Odds Ratio
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)
Confidence Intervals
Surveys and Questionnaires
Research

Keywords

  • Advertising
  • Alcohol
  • Brand
  • Underage Drinking
  • Youth

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine (miscellaneous)
  • Psychiatry and Mental health
  • Toxicology

Cite this

The Relationship Between Brand-Specific Alcohol Advertising on Television and Brand-Specific Consumption Among Underage Youth. / Ross, Craig S.; Maple, Emily; Siegel, Michael; Dejong, William; Naimi, Timothy S.; Ostroff, Joshua; Padon, Alisa A.; Borzekowski, Dina L G; Jernigan, David H.

In: Alcoholism: Clinical and Experimental Research, Vol. 38, No. 8, 2014, p. 2234-2242.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Ross, CS, Maple, E, Siegel, M, Dejong, W, Naimi, TS, Ostroff, J, Padon, AA, Borzekowski, DLG & Jernigan, DH 2014, 'The Relationship Between Brand-Specific Alcohol Advertising on Television and Brand-Specific Consumption Among Underage Youth', Alcoholism: Clinical and Experimental Research, vol. 38, no. 8, pp. 2234-2242. https://doi.org/10.1111/acer.12488
Ross, Craig S. ; Maple, Emily ; Siegel, Michael ; Dejong, William ; Naimi, Timothy S. ; Ostroff, Joshua ; Padon, Alisa A. ; Borzekowski, Dina L G ; Jernigan, David H. / The Relationship Between Brand-Specific Alcohol Advertising on Television and Brand-Specific Consumption Among Underage Youth. In: Alcoholism: Clinical and Experimental Research. 2014 ; Vol. 38, No. 8. pp. 2234-2242.
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abstract = "Being able to investigate the relationship between underage drinkers' preferences for particular brands and their exposure to advertising for those brands would represent a significant advance in alcohol marketing research. However, no previous national study has examined the relationship between underage youth exposure to brand-specific alcohol advertising and consumption of those brands. Methods: We conducted a cross-sectional, Internet-based survey of a national sample of 1,031 youth, ages 13-20, who had consumed at least 1 drink of alcohol in the past 30 days. We ascertained all alcohol brands consumed by respondents in the past 30 days. The main outcome measure was brand-specific consumption during the past 30 days, measured as a dichotomous variable. The main predictor variable was exposure to brand-specific alcohol advertising on television. The respondents reported which of 20 television shows popular with youth they had watched during the past 30 days. For each respondent, we calculated a standard measure of potential exposure to the brand-specific alcohol advertising that aired on those shows during the preceding 12 months, based on Nielsen (New York, NY) estimates of the youth audience for each show's telecasts. Results: Compared to no brand-specific advertising exposure, any exposure was associated with an increased likelihood of brand-specific consumption (adjusted odds ratio 3.02; 95{\%} confidence interval: 2.61-3.49) after controlling for several individual- and brand-level variables. When measured as a continuous variable, the relationship between advertising exposure and brand consumption was nonlinear, with a large association at lower levels of exposure and diminishing incremental effects as the level of exposure increased. Conclusions: There is a robust relationship between youth's brand-specific exposure to alcohol advertising on television and their consumption of those same alcohol brands during the past 30 days. This study provides further evidence of a strong association between alcohol advertising and youth drinking behavior.",
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