The psychosocial work environment of physicians: The impact of demands and resources on job dissatisfaction and psychiatric distress in a longitudinal study of johns hopkins medical school graduates

Jeffrey V. Johnson, Ellen M. Hall, Daniel E. Ford, Lucy A. Mead, David M. Levine, Nae Yuh Wang, Michael J. Klag

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

This study examines the relationship between the psychosocial work environment and cross-sectional job dissatisfaction and prospective psychiatric distress in a cohort of Hopkins Medical School graduates in midcareer. An instrument was constructed consisting of five scales: psychological job demands, patient demands, work control, physician resources, and coworker support. The results of scale reliability and factor analysis are presented. Higher job demands were found to be associated with increases in job dissatisfaction and psychiatric distress and greater resources were associated with decreased levels of dissatisfaction and distress. In multiple-regression analysis, only work control and social support were found to be independently associated with dissatisfaction and distress. These results suggest that the presence of control and social support at work protects physicians from developing job dissatisfaction and psychiatric distress.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1151-1159
Number of pages9
JournalJournal of occupational and environmental medicine
Volume37
Issue number9
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 1995

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'The psychosocial work environment of physicians: The impact of demands and resources on job dissatisfaction and psychiatric distress in a longitudinal study of johns hopkins medical school graduates'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

  • Cite this