The program cost and cost-effectiveness of screening men for Chlamydia to prevent pelvic inflammatory disease in women.

Thomas L. Gift, Charlotte A. Gaydos, Charlotte K. Kent, Jeanne M. Marrazzo, Cornelis A. Rietmeijer, Julia A. Schillinger, Eileen F. Dunne

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Because men transmit Chlamydia trachomatis to women, screening men to prevent pelvic inflammatory disease in women may be a viable strategy. However, the cost-effectiveness of this approach requires careful assessment. METHODS: Data from a demonstration project and longitudinal study that examined screening men for chlamydia were applied to a compartment-based transmission model to estimate the cost-effectiveness of screening men for chlamydia compared with alternative interventions, including expanded screening of women and combining disease investigation specialist-provided partner notification with screening. Cases of pelvic inflammatory disease and quality-adjusted life years lost were the primary outcome measures. A male screening program that screened 1% of men in the population annually was modeled. RESULTS: A program targeting high-risk men for screening (those with a larger number of partners in the previous year than the general population and a higher chlamydia prevalence) was cost saving compared with using equivalent program dollars to expand screening of lower-risk women. Combining partner notification with male screening was more effective than screening men alone. In sensitivity analyses, the male program was not always cost saving but averaged $10,520 per quality-adjusted life year saved over expanded screening of women. CONCLUSIONS: Screening men can be a cost-effective alternative to screening women, but the men screened must have a relatively high prevalence compared with the women to whom screening would be expanded (under baseline assumptions, the prevalence in screened men was 86% higher than that of screened women). These modeling results suggest that programs targeting venues that have access to high-risk men can be effective tools in chlamydia prevention.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)S66-75
JournalSexually transmitted diseases
Volume35
Issue number11 Suppl
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 2008
Externally publishedYes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Dermatology
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Microbiology (medical)
  • Infectious Diseases

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